Chicago culture – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ Thu, 19 May 2022 17:56:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chicago43rd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Chicago culture – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ 32 32 Athletes with a climate cause, postcards for the planet and more https://chicago43rd.org/athletes-with-a-climate-cause-postcards-for-the-planet-and-more/ Thu, 19 May 2022 17:25:15 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/athletes-with-a-climate-cause-postcards-for-the-planet-and-more/ It can be difficult to connect with nature in our daily lives. But with a little help, you can find nature anywhere. With that in mind, here’s some recent arts and culture news to help you bring nature to life, wherever you are. 1. Athletes scramble to stop climate breakdown Running a marathon is hard. […]]]>

It can be difficult to connect with nature in our daily lives. But with a little help, you can find nature anywhere. With that in mind, here’s some recent arts and culture news to help you bring nature to life, wherever you are.

1. Athletes scramble to stop climate breakdown

Running a marathon is hard. Running a marathon during a record heat wave is downright dangerous.

As climate change accelerates, this scenario is becoming a growing concern – which is why athletes from all sports have a role to play in ending the climate crisis, said Conservation International CEO Mr Sanjayan , in a recent episode of Nike’s TRAINED podcast.

Hosted by Nike Editorial Director Jaclyn Byrer, this podcast typically explores techniques for becoming a better athlete or improving your personal fitness. In this special episode, Byer invites Sanjayan and American marathon runner Joan Benoit Samuelson to discuss the impact of climate change on athletes – and how human health is linked to the health of the planet.

An avid outdoorsman, Sanjayan has witnessed climate impacts firsthand, sharing in the episode how he struggles to steal fish and hike near his home in Montana because “the rivers are [often] too hot to fish and the air is too difficult to breathe.

But it’s not the sporting activities that worry him the most; these are the people whose livelihoods depend on the outdoors.

“We can get outside in a luxurious way, but think about people who have to work outside, who have to earn a living from farming or agriculture,” Sanjayan said. “For them, it’s not just ‘nice to have’. For them, it’s life or death.

Fortunately, individuals – especially athletes – have a big role to play in bringing attention to the climate crisis and the actions that could help end it.

“We need collective action – that’s frankly where we need the sporting community,” Sanjayan said. “Think how fanatical people are about their teams. Athletes are change makers and always have been. How we can engage with people who are athletes… is going to be a huge driver for a collective action on things like climate.

2. Postcards to protect the planet

Postcards capture a snapshot of a treasured memory – from childhood vacations to a once in a lifetime adventure.

A recent edition of Grist’s “Fix” series instead uses postcards to showcase people’s memories of nature – and the moment that solidified their passion for protecting it.

The authors invited dozens of people across the climate movement – ​​from activists to farmers – to share photographs and short entries about their relationship with the outdoors.

For example, Olatunji Oboi Reed, an advocate for justice, paints a picture of how cycling along Chicago’s beach helped her find community and weather a bout of depression during the pandemic.

“I noticed there were other black people on the trail, and they would recognize me,” she wrote. “It was so important, because I had been socially isolated for several months. As I ride, the wind blows the leaves of the trees and it sounds like music. All of this – the whole experience – was nature that spoke to me in a way I had never experienced.

Unfortunately, other memories were not so pleasant. Accompanying a photo of the Lake Michigan coast, an entry by climate activist Kyle Meyaard-Schaap describes his experience with water pollution in a lake near his hometown of Holland, Michigan.

“[The lake] was contaminated due to heavy phosphorus runoff from agricultural land,” he wrote. “Its name is Lake Macatawa – and its nickname was Lake Maca-toilet, because it smelled like rotten fish.”

Meyaard-Schaap explained how this experience fueled her desire to protect nature so that future generations can enjoy it.

“[The lake] is a resource that was meant to be enjoyed, just like Lake Michigan, but it couldn’t be enjoyed… It was meant to be a gift, and it was more of a threat,” he wrote. “I’ve come to understand that how we treat the world around us is directly related to how we treat our neighbor.”

3. A carbon podcast we can’t afford to lose

Hosted by brothers Ty and Brock Benefiel, The Climate Pod podcast explores nearly every area impacted by the climate crisis, from politics and economics to culture and social justice.

In a recent episode, the brothers invite experts to discuss one of humanity’s greatest allies in the fight against climate breakdown: nature.

It is particularly important, according to Will Turner of Conservation International – a guest on this series – to protect nature reserves from so-called “sunk carbon” – that is, vast stores of carbon which, if they were released, could not be restored by 2050, when the world must reach net zero emissions.

“There are huge amounts of carbon in ecosystems that have built up there so slowly … that if we lose it, we’re not going to get it back,” Turner said. “It’s not like when your lawn regrows next week – it takes hundreds to thousands of years to accumulate that carbon.”

Conservation International conducted groundbreaking studies of unrecoverable carbon in 2020 and 2021. They found that ecosystems on six continents contain more than 260 billion tonnes of unrecoverable carbon, most of which is stored in mangroves, peatlands, forests ancient and swamps.

If these ecosystems were to be destroyed by human activity, the carbon they emit would effectively prevent humanity from limiting global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit), the benchmark for a climate “safe” set by the 2015 Paris Agreement.

According to the study, increasing the amount of land under protection in key areas by just 5.4% would prevent 75% of Earth’s unrecoverable carbon from being released into the atmosphere. Fortunately, many world leaders have rallied around a common goal of protecting 30% of land and seas by 2030 – a goal informally known as the “30 by 30” initiative.

The problem? We must act now, not in a few years.

“Soon is not an acceptable substitute at this time,” Turner said. “Fortunately, it is in our power to do something about it. We know what we need to do: decarbonize energy in industry, research technologies to remove CO2, protect and restore ecosystems globally, all in parallel. »

Cover image: A runner at sunset (© brentlloyd)

Kiley Price is the editor and managing editor of Conservation International. Want to read more stories like this? Sign up here to receive updates by email. Donate to Conservation International here.


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Benefits and culture key to hiring and retaining workers, executives say – archyde https://chicago43rd.org/benefits-and-culture-key-to-hiring-and-retaining-workers-executives-say-archyde/ Tue, 17 May 2022 04:11:44 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/benefits-and-culture-key-to-hiring-and-retaining-workers-executives-say-archyde/ Left to right: Alison Kippen, Liza Berger, Steven Chies, Amy Schectman, Brenda Connelly, Jim White and Demetress Harrell discuss the caregiver shortage during a session during the McKnight’s Women of Distinction Forum. (Photo by Tori Soper Photography) CHICAGO — Combining wage increases with innovative benefits and a culture that rewards loyalty is a key way […]]]>
Left to right: Alison Kippen, Liza Berger, Steven Chies, Amy Schectman, Brenda Connelly, Jim White and Demetress Harrell discuss the caregiver shortage during a session during the McKnight’s Women of Distinction Forum. (Photo by Tori Soper Photography)

CHICAGO — Combining wage increases with innovative benefits and a culture that rewards loyalty is a key way to improve long-term care hiring and retention, six industry leaders said last week.

What doesn’t work is a cookie-cutter approach that just gives money to potential workers, speakers agreed at the McKnight’s Women of Distinction Forum Friday morning.

“I’ll tell you, having been through these crises throughout my career, there isn’t enough money to spend to fix the problem in the short or long term,” said Steven Chies, president of North Cities. Health Care and a 40 long term care veteran. “You need to have the data and the information before you can decide what the solution is. If you think in medical terms, you diagnose and then you prescribe.

North Cities, based in New Brighton, Minnesota, offers assisted living and skilled nursing. Chies’ comments came during “Work It: Smart Ways to address the nursing missing,” an hour-long educational panel moderated by McKnight Home Care Editor Liza Berger.

Other panelists included Brenda Connelly, RN, COO of McMinnville, senior living provider The Springs Living; Demetress Harrell, CEO of Hospice in the Pines, Lufkin, TX; Alison Kippen, vice president of human resources for Senior Lifestyle, a Chicago-based long-term care company; Amy Schectman, president and CEO of Boston-based 2Life Communities; and Jim White, associate and chief culture officer at Chicago-based Ignite Medical Resorts. They shared their biggest challenges, innovations that worked, and tips for improving recruitment and retention in other communities.

While much of the focus has been on staff losses among frontline caregivers, concerns about management, catering and housekeeping shortages are growing in health care facilities and residences for the elderly.

“There were people at the employee level who were stepping in and providing so much and that tension and struggle really made them wonder: is the reason I got into this still the same?” Connelly recounted. “But it’s also been a great opportunity on the employee front in particular, to be able to recruit and reach people from other industries, because now they’re sitting there wondering: Am I satisfied with my job?”

Patch new holes

White said health care can be sold as a stable profession with a growth curve ahead, when other industries may shrink. But he, too, saw challenges develop beyond nursing.

“Therapeutic discipline has also become extremely difficult, where therapists now, due to increased salaries, they see that they can leave and earn more money,” he said. “Sometimes you can compete and sometimes you can’t. … We actually had a big therapeutic hole this year.

Ignite Medical Reports has expanded to 14 locations in the central United States during the pandemic. White said recruitment and retention have been aided by the company’s “Superheroes in Scrubs” program, which rewards reliable employees with attendance bonuses, additional paid time off and gift cards.

“While we may not be able to compete with some of these exorbitant signing bonuses or salaries being paid to travelers or hospitals…I can be competitive enough and have other things behind that will look attractive,” White added.

Schechtman’s business doesn’t hire caregivers, but she’s faced many challenges filling maintenance and catering positions. Despite raising the minimum hourly wage to $19.25 and salaried employees to $40,000 a year, well-trained maintenance workers were still recruited for union jobs paying more than double the rate.

Although 2Life has moved to sliding-scale insurance premiums and started contributing to 401(k)s even for low-income workers who don’t pay themselves, Schechtman said higher-level solutions are needed.

“If you look at it on a very micro level, each of us can’t solve it with money,” she said. “If you look at the societal level, there’s a lot of money out there; for example: if we had Medicare for all; if we had a national minimum wage of $25 an hour. … If we made affordable housing a right instead of only nursing homes a right, we could change so much.

What works for them

Other recent benefits and intangibles added by panelist organizations:

  • Suspend salary increases for senior executives to give lower-paid employees bigger increases in the face of inflation.
  • Increase in paid leave to three weeks for all staff.
  • Added separate bereavement leave.
  • New bereavement counseling and support services.
  • Instant access to paychecks.
  • Launched flexible spending accounts to improve affordability of child care services.
  • Faster job offers after application and interview.

Harrell added that the hiring conversation needs to start before the individual worker applies. Like Kippen, she said the staffing crisis began before COVID-19, though it has been exacerbated by the pandemic. The problems are worse in areas where wages are suppressed.

“These shortages have taken nurses out of our communities, and they are now being paid a higher rate of pay to travel,” said Harrell, who noted that among nurses who graduated from a community college near her, only 3% went to work locally. . “They know they’re going to have that metropolitan dollar versus the rural rate. We may have the financial resources, but we don’t have the person.

When employers find the person, they have to be “ready to go” to make an offer, Harrell added. His comment was echoed by Connelly, whose company recently joined social media platform TikTok to help build excitement for the brand and attract applicants.

“Digital marketing is where you need to be,” she said. “Everything has to be displayed beautifully and quickly, because you only capture their attention for a short time. And then, once they reach out, you need to be there immediately and ready to attack the interview process.

Despite the pressure to work quickly and creatively, HR staff members must continue to support existing employees. Kippen said leaders must teach compassion as a key strategy and value.

“I think I hire this person to take care of a human being. It’s my job to take care of them,” Kippen said. benefits that are competitive in the market for what they do, but then… we have to be compassionate as well. a big chunk that we have to overcome.

The session was the second of three held during the annual meeting McKnight’s Women of Distinction Forum. For coverage of the first session, click here.

PointClickCare is the Diamond sponsor of this year’s event. OnShift and PharMerica are the Silver sponsors. The bronze sponsor is Reliant Rehabilitation. Table sponsors include Dreamscape, Gojo/Purell and Sound Physicians.

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Broccoli Fest 2022 brings out Wale and DC culture as fans show Gunna plays last set before RICO sweep – SOHH.com https://chicago43rd.org/broccoli-fest-2022-brings-out-wale-and-dc-culture-as-fans-show-gunna-plays-last-set-before-rico-sweep-sohh-com/ Sun, 15 May 2022 05:27:35 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/broccoli-fest-2022-brings-out-wale-and-dc-culture-as-fans-show-gunna-plays-last-set-before-rico-sweep-sohh-com/ Two years removed due to the coronavirus pandemic and now with the addition of a second festival day, Broccoli Fest in Washington DC was back outdoors and upped the ante considerably this year. Hip-hop and R&B superstars flocked to the nation’s capital, enduring the inclement weather to celebrate black excellence, DMV musical talent and culture. […]]]>

Two years removed due to the coronavirus pandemic and now with the addition of a second festival day, Broccoli Fest in Washington DC was back outdoors and upped the ante considerably this year. Hip-hop and R&B superstars flocked to the nation’s capital, enduring the inclement weather to celebrate black excellence, DMV musical talent and culture. The event was a moment for DC rap culture. It is also the last performance of the Georgian rapper Gunna who leave the scene a few hours before the announcement of his RICO indictment.


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naughty rico illuminated the scene with a fire that the water of the sky could not extinguish. She stopped her set halfway for a personal birthday party. Wales put on his city, bringing out not only an immense amount of DC talent, but a surprise appearance from Polo G. which threw everyone for a loop. Lil DurkThe band’s live performance for the first part of their set made everyone feel every word they spit. Then came the truly unforgettable moments. Assistant got out Time (who also wowed the crowd with his own solo set) to sing their hit, “Essence.”

summer walker commented that she was arrested by the police on her way to the festival itself. During Ari Lennox’s performance, there was a gay couple who proposed on stage which made him cry.

And then there was GunnaThe spectacular performance by , which would be his last – the ATL rapper would perform Pushin P and leave the stage hours before his RICO indictment was announced.

The Moment Wale Brought These DC Artists On Stage in his hometown, seemed like a culture-changing moment in DC’s music and festival scene. With big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles all having their own music festivals, it felt like a “Why not us?” moment, because throughout the day, MCs shouted at the crowd asking “Where you from?” and the cheers when they arrived at the DMV were deafening.

With a lineup featuring stars like Lil Durk, Gunna, Wizkid, Tems, 21 Savage and local hero Wale and headlined by Ari Lennox and Summer Walker, Broccoli Fest 2022 showcased the DMV’s diverse demographic and varied tastes, ranging from hard music to music for the soul. You could sing your heart out with a certain Ari Lennox and then rap your heart out with a Durk. This dynamic is just a preview for not only more to come for Broccoli Fest, especially the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia festival scene as a whole.

Then there’s Pharrell Williams’ “Something In The Water Festival” on June 16, 2022 in downtown Washington, DC.

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Emile Hirsch to Star in Michael MacRae’s Canceled Cultural Drama ‘My Time’s Up’ – Deadline https://chicago43rd.org/emile-hirsch-to-star-in-michael-macraes-canceled-cultural-drama-my-times-up-deadline/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:51:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/emile-hirsch-to-star-in-michael-macraes-canceled-cultural-drama-my-times-up-deadline/ EXCLUSIVE: Emile Hirsch (Once upon a time… in Hollywood) will produce and perform in My time is upan upcoming indie drama from writer-director Michael MacRae (Fishbowl California). The film centers on fictional comedian Micky Hoffman, who faces backlash after a stand-up set, then returns to his Midwestern hometown to mentor rising, “woke” comics. MacRae, Michael […]]]>

EXCLUSIVE: Emile Hirsch (Once upon a time… in Hollywood) will produce and perform in My time is upan upcoming indie drama from writer-director Michael MacRae (Fishbowl California).

The film centers on fictional comedian Micky Hoffman, who faces backlash after a stand-up set, then returns to his Midwestern hometown to mentor rising, “woke” comics.

MacRae, Michael Nassau and Pritesh Shah will produce under their 290 West Productions banner, along with Max Adler (The Chicago Trial 7) exec producing and acting on camera. Buffalo 8’s Nikki Stier Justice, Grady Justice, Luke Taylor and Matthew Helderman will also serve as executive producers on the project, which marks MacRae’s follow-up to the 2018 comedy-drama. Fishbowl California, with Kate Flannery and Katrina Bowden. Thomas Sullivan is handling the casting.

Hirsch is perhaps best known for his SAG Award-nominated turn as Chris McCandless in Sean Penn’s 2007 film In nature. The actor has also appeared in films including The Immaculate Room, Once upon a time… in Hollywood, Midnight in the Switchgrass, The return path, savages, The darkest hour, Milk, speed racer, dominant dog, Lords of Dogtown and The Dangerous Lives of Choir Boys, among other projects. We will also see him soon in an action thriller The price we payThriller in French sleep stateK. Asher Levin’s Helen is dead and Digthe crime drama The Gemini loungeand Steven C. Miller Course. He is set to make his debut as a screenwriter with Tandema climbing thriller in which he will also star.

Hirsch is represented by UTA; Adler de Buchwald and Artists First.

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Boy George Talks Music, Acting, and Upcoming Culture Club Tour During Sunday Brunch https://chicago43rd.org/boy-george-talks-music-acting-and-upcoming-culture-club-tour-during-sunday-brunch/ Sun, 08 May 2022 13:39:36 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/boy-george-talks-music-acting-and-upcoming-culture-club-tour-during-sunday-brunch/ The irrepressible Boy George opened up about his love of songs, his music, his acting lessons and the upcoming Culture Club tour at Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch this morning. Along with British pop royalty , hosts Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer were guests, early Lancashire novelist and young girl Sarah Cox – and Hullraisers actress […]]]>

The irrepressible Boy George opened up about his love of songs, his music, his acting lessons and the upcoming Culture Club tour at Channel 4’s Sunday Brunch this morning. Along with British pop royalty , hosts Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer were guests, early Lancashire novelist and young girl Sarah Cox – and Hullraisers actress Leah Brotherhead.

There were lots of laughs and ideas on the popular, laid-back and light-hearted program, which celebrated its 10th anniversary earlier this year. Guests clearly had fun talking about their careers and upcoming projects — and, of course, enjoying food and drinks.

Culture Club fans were treated to another viewing of the band’s classic 80s video from their hit ‘Do You Really Want to Hurt Me’ as Boy George settled on the couch for his chat with Tim and Simon . “It was an era of electronic music,” he said. “Actually, I wanted to do something faster.

READ MORE:Boy George’s Net Worth, Relationship History & Greatest Hits with Culture Club

“He thought it was too slow, and I should have done more Madonna stuff.” He added: “It’s funny because I’m not that person anymore. I can only deal with how I am now. When I look at that person now, it’s hilarious – I think ‘Who is that queen?’ “

Explaining the reason he appeared barefoot on Top of the Pops, George said it was because of his obsession with sixties diva Sandy Shaw. Speaking about his love of music, he said, “Actually, I like songs, I’m not interested in singers. Some of my favorite singers can’t sing, like Bob Dylan – I want to hear the truth and the humor.”

He added that he enjoyed listening to the surreal lyrics the most – songs such as Lou Reed’s Walk on the Wild Side. “It’s so surreal,” he said.

Viewers got to see a snippet of his latest track – “The Boy Who Sat by the Window”. Georgle also talked about releasing records and his upcoming tours with Culture Club. “I turned 60 last June and I wanted to release 60 songs to celebrate it. I think right now I’m 28 now.

“I’ve probably released more records in the last three months than most people have probably released in their entire career. I love pop music. I’m my record company, so I’m my own. boss and I can do whatever I want.”

Always so flamboyant and stylish, and apparently at a very good place in his life, George wore a giant green hat that wouldn’t have looked out of place on the set of the movie Gangs of New York. Culture Club will headline a ‘Heritage Live’ concert at Kenwood House, Hamstead, London on Friday 17th June.

They will be supported by other British pop legends – Bananarama and Lulu, and DJ Fat Tony. George said his band would play gigs in Las Vegas. “We’re still touring, but or the last two years haven’t been able to,” he said. “I’ve always wanted to do shows in the States, so we’re going to Vegas, which is exciting.”

He also revealed that he was taking acting lessons. “I’ve been taking acting classes for two years,” he said. “I help build my confidence on stage. It’s like a kind of therapy for my singing and it helps me in my performance.” George explained that it helps him relax and connect with the public.

Viewers were delighted to see Boy George looking so happy and healthy, and many took to the official Sunday Brunch Twitter account to express their approval. “The new song is classy. Very late Bowie,” said Michael Treanor.

“I really enjoyed listening to it this morning, I’m not usually a fan, but it was funny and endearing,” @natruss7 wrote. While Tina Rice added, “Perfect Sunday morning, food and @boygeorge…nice interview x.”

BBC Radio 2 teatime presenter Sara Cox was on the couch promoting her debut novel ‘Thrown’, which will be available to buy from May 12. Set in her home town of Bolton, the story revolves around three women whose paths, problems and sorrows cross when they join a pottery class at a local community centre.

They include the character of Shiela, who she describes as a cross between Coronation Street’s Bet Lynch and legendary American actress and singer Bette Midler. The plot includes “cheating and exes”, including an ex-partner who may or may not be in jail, and how people “can come together and change”.

On the creative writing process, she said: “I had the idea and as I was writing the characters almost formed in front of me, almost telling me where to go next. That’s the most fun – invent things.”

Leah Brotherhead, who plays Toni in Channel 4’s hit comedy series Hullraisers, has revealed there are plans to do a second series of the show. She also talked about playing Cathy in an upcoming theater production of Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, which will tour Berkley and Los Angeles, California and Chicago.

Jay See, commenting on Twitter, said: “I absolutely loved watching Hullraisers! My new catchphrase is ‘If that doesn’t make me feel amazing I gotta go’ – with a Hull accent.”

Other guests on today’s show included Kiell Smith-Bynoe, chef Jeremy Pang and a live performance by Scottish indie pop band Belle and Sebastian.

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A study of corrupt police ‘crews’ is a reminder that police culture must change https://chicago43rd.org/a-study-of-corrupt-police-crews-is-a-reminder-that-police-culture-must-change/ Sat, 07 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/a-study-of-corrupt-police-crews-is-a-reminder-that-police-culture-must-change/ Bad behavior in policing can be like a raging wildfire or an infectious disease. Misconduct is contagious. And when wayward officers are reassigned, they can continue to negatively influence their peers, compounding the problem, according to a 2019 study published in Nature Human Behavior analyzing the London Metropolitan Police Service. For every 10% increase in […]]]>

Bad behavior in policing can be like a raging wildfire or an infectious disease.

Misconduct is contagious. And when wayward officers are reassigned, they can continue to negatively influence their peers, compounding the problem, according to a 2019 study published in Nature Human Behavior analyzing the London Metropolitan Police Service.

For every 10% increase in the proportion of a police officer’s peers with a history of misconduct, that officer’s odds of committing wrongdoing in the next three months increased by nearly 8%, according to research from a pair of behavioral economists.

A new study closer to home, looking at the Chicago Police Department between 1971 and 2018, reinforces these findings and further exposes how problem officers often travel in packs.

Research by a Northwestern University team led by sociologist Andrew Papachristos recalls torture allegations against the disgraced late Cmdr. Jon Burge and his “Midnight Squad,” as well as the abuse accusations that continue to smear retired detective Reynaldo Guevara and his underlings.

Although the NU study does not name Burge and Guevara or any other infamous officers, it serves as a stark reminder of why the culture within the CPD must be dismantled.

Further reforms will be for naught unless a toxic culture is replaced with attitudes and practices that reinforce accountability and prevent violence and other misconduct from spreading like a cancerous tumor.

Reporting “hot spots” for misconduct

Papachristos and his team identified 160 potentially problematic CPD “teams” with an algorithm using arrest reports, citizen complaints, prosecutions and use of force reports over the nearly five-decade span. .

Even though research ethics have prevented Papachristos from identifying specific officers in these crews, the information will be made available to the CPD so that a system can be created in which possible patterns of abuse and criminal behavior can be reported, reported Andy Grimm of the Chicago Sun-Times. .

“Police love data as a way to identify ‘hot spots’ for criminal activity,” as Papachristos put it. “This is data identifying hotspots within the department.”

It makes sense – and in the best interest of the police department – to seize this opportunity and use the results to weed out corruption and get rid of “rotten” officers. It is these officers who are largely responsible for eroding Chicagoans’ confidence in law enforcement.

In addition, the NU study should lead other entities to ensure that they have enough effective staff to help solve the problem. That includes the city’s legal department, which has a backlog of police dismissal cases attributed by some to a staffing shortage, WBEZ reported last month.

The sooner officers who engage in illegal behavior are removed from the streets, the better for residents — and for the many honest men and women in uniform trying to make a positive difference in the communities they serve.

Clearly, the crew cops – 4% of the 30,000 officers surveyed for the NU study – were not role models.

They were involved in 22% of all police shootings over the nearly 50-year period, the data shows. They also accounted for 14% of all citizen complaints and nearly 30% of all civil rights lawsuits against the city.

Worse still, the payouts in these lawsuits were four times higher than in cases involving officers who were not identified as part of a crew.

A matter of will

Street gangs kill lives and damage the community. The gangs among those who wear CPD badges are just as harmful, if not worse, since they are sworn to serve and protect.

To identify police teams, Papachristos actually applied the same methodology he used to analyze gang members and identify likely victims of gun violence.

Papachristos and his team also created a profile for potentially corrupt crews by reviewing the case of the former Chicago police sergeant. Ronald Watts and his cronies and the actions of groups of officers in two other high-profile scandals of the mid-1990s and early 2000s.

The CPD, mandated to make reforms by a 2019 federal consent decree, cannot afford another crisis related to a problem cluster or corrupt officials. No Chicagoan wants to see that either.

The department must find the will to rebuild a culture that has allowed these unscrupulous police teams to exist and flourish.

Fighting crime inside the department is as urgent as fighting it elsewhere.

Send letters to letters@suntimes.com.

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Get your Culture here: Five experiences to have in May 2022: Culture: Smile politely https://chicago43rd.org/get-your-culture-here-five-experiences-to-have-in-may-2022-culture-smile-politely/ Wed, 04 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/get-your-culture-here-five-experiences-to-have-in-may-2022-culture-smile-politely/ The school year is winding down, hot days are becoming more frequent, and those in power are systematically chipping away at our rights with each passing day. And with that, here are my deals for digging into CU culture this month. Find ways to support reproductive justice It’s really hard for me to think about […]]]>

The school year is winding down, hot days are becoming more frequent, and those in power are systematically chipping away at our rights with each passing day. And with that, here are my deals for digging into CU culture this month.





Find ways to support reproductive justice

It’s really hard for me to think about anything else this week, as the devastating, but not shocking, news regarding the Supreme Court’s leaked draft opinion expunging Roe v. Wade dominate my brain. It should dominate all of our brains. We are blessed to live in a state that will uphold reproductive justice regardless of Supreme Court rulings (please vote for these people who will continue to do so), but as we have learned, nothing is sacred. Also, while Illinois has few restrictions on abortion, that doesn’t mean it’s readily available statewide. Last year we looked at the kind of access we have in CU, and it’s not great. You can benefit from a medical abortion for up to 11 weeks, but there are no surgical options. The closest place to get a surgical abortion is Springfield. Beyond that, most abortion providers are concentrated in the Chicago area. Not great. Especially when Planned Parenthood of Illinois expects an influx of 20,000 to 30,000 patients per year if Illinois becomes a “safe haven” for abortion care. Planned Parenthood of Illinois is trying to raise more funds so it can add more telehealth medical abortion facilities and options. If you’re inclined to donate or support them through volunteer work or activism, check out their website. Midwest Access Coalition helps people who travel to, from or within the Midwest obtain an abortion.

Photo by Alyssa Buckley.

Raise a toast to Taylor Street

Three of my favorite things to do in the summer are listening to live music outside, drinking and dining outside, and shopping outside. Toast To Taylor Street combines all of these things in an event, and this time it takes place on the first Saturday of every month, from May to October! The new Toast to Taylor Street Downtown Block Party series is an outdoor market and music festival all rolled into one, celebrating all that Downtown Champaign has to offer. The first installment is May 7 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. The weather seems to be perfect, so head downtown, do some shopping, enjoy some food and drink on one of the many terraces in the area, and listen to some great local bands. Can’t come this month? You have five more chances.

Photo from the Facebook event page.

Learn to forage

Did you know that there are all kinds of native plants in these areas that you can safely eat? If you want to learn about forage plants, either out of curiosity or for survival in the woods, Delight Flower Farm can help. Okay, they don’t really claim to be able to help you survive in the Illinois wilderness, but you’ll definitely come away with some interesting information. You will learn what edible weeds and native food plants are, and how to safely incorporate these natural elements into your cooking and diet. After a presentation, you will have a hands-on practice. The workshop is May 14 from 1 to 2:30 p.m., and it’s $25. Register at the Flower Farm of Delights website.

Photo taken from Illinois Athletics website.

watch tennis

The University of Illinois is hosting the NCAA Men’s and Women’s Tennis Championships from May 19-28, which is pretty impressive. The first part of the week, May 19-22, will be the Tag Team Championship, with the rest of the dates dedicated to individual play. Tickets range from a ticket for all sessions at $108, $58 for all teams or all individual sessions, to $17 for a specific group of matches (i.e. men’s quarter-finals , women’s finals, etc.). an opportunity is to see it live and in person. It’s dramatic, fast-paced, and in it you’ll get to see the best of the best college players. Olivier Stuart of Illinois will play in the men’s singles tournament.

Photo by Julie McClure.

Go see the peonies

We wait for the Sakura of Japan House to bloom in April, in May we watch for the peonies of Allerton. Their famous peony garden will soon be in bloom, and it’s a must see. Like the Sakura, peony flowers are ephemeral. Once they start to bloom, you have to go there to see them. Go multiple times, as they bloom in phases. They also have fun names like Cheddar Surprise, Fairy’s Petticoat, Auntie Sherry, and Kansas Spiffy. Allerton is hosting a garden dedication on May 26 at 5:30 p.m. if you want to mingle and enjoy drinks and snacks with the flowers.

Top photo from Wikipedia Commons.

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CoinFlip Wins 2022 Best Workplaces Culture Excellence Awards https://chicago43rd.org/coinflip-wins-2022-best-workplaces-culture-excellence-awards/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:44:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/coinflip-wins-2022-best-workplaces-culture-excellence-awards/ Chicago-based cryptocurrency firm earns national recognition for innovation, leadership and work-life flexibility CHICAGO, April 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CoinFlip, a leading provider of cryptocurrency investment services, today announced that it has been awarded the 2022 Top Workplaces Culture Excellence accolades for Innovation, Leadership and Work-Life Flexibility. Awarded by Energage, the research company with over 16 […]]]>

Chicago-based cryptocurrency firm earns national recognition for innovation, leadership and work-life flexibility

CHICAGO, April 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — CoinFlip, a leading provider of cryptocurrency investment services, today announced that it has been awarded the 2022 Top Workplaces Culture Excellence accolades for Innovation, Leadership and Work-Life Flexibility. Awarded by Energage, the research company with over 16 years of experience working with over 27 million employees in 70,000 organizations, the Top Workplaces awards are based solely on employee feedback.

The Top Workplaces Culture Excellence Awards recognize organizations that excel in specific areas of workplace culture:

  • The Innovation Top Workplaces award recognizes organizations that have embedded innovation into their culture and created an environment where new ideas emanate from all employees.
  • The Leadership Top Workplaces award recognizes organizations whose leaders inspire confidence in their employees and company management. These leaders understand the customer needs that frontline employees hear every day.
  • The Work-Life Flexibility Top Workplaces award recognizes organizations that give their employees options for how and where they work, as well as managers who care about the concerns of their employees.

“At CoinFlip, our workplace is more than just a successful business, it’s a family. We prioritize building community and put our employees at the forefront of everything we do. We are extremely grateful for our FlipFam and honored that our team’s feedback has earned us recognition as a Top Workplace,” said Ben Weiss, CEO of CoinFlip. “The team is constantly growing and evolving to keep up with the rapid pace of the cryptocurrency industry. We look forward to hiring new talent in 2022 as our portfolio and footprint grows, and we will continue to do so. of our corporate culture and our innovation a priority.”

The Top Workplaces awards are based on a research-backed 24-point employee engagement survey.

“Top Workplaces is a beacon for organizations as well as a sign of resilience and impressive performance,” said Eric Rubino, CEO of Energage. “When you give your employees a voice, you come together to take on challenges and shape your path forward. Top Workplaces relies on real-time insights into what works best for their organization, so they can make informed decisions that positively impact their people and their business.”

Named the #1 fastest growing company in Chicago by Crain’s Chicago Business, CoinFlip posted a five-year growth rate of 1.7 million percent and revenue of nearly $100 million in 2021. The company was also ranked #60 on the Inc. 5000, the highest ranked crypto company on the list. Since its inception, the company has expanded to more than 3,500 Bitcoin ATMs in 49 states, taking its place at the forefront of a financial revolution where cryptocurrency and blockchain technology can empower investors. Across the country.

For more information about CoinFlip, please visit www.CoinFlip.tech and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, instagram and LinkedIn.

About CoinFlip:
CoinFlip is a leading provider of cryptocurrency investment services. The company operates the world’s largest cryptocurrency kiosk network by transaction volume with over 3,500 machines in 49 states supporting the buying and selling of major cryptocurrencies for cash. In 2020, CoinFlip launched Trade Desk, an over-the-counter trading service that provides investors with a personal account manager and competitive coin prices. The company charges no hidden fees, cuts typical transaction fees in half, and provides 24/7 customer support.

CoinFlip was founded in 2015 by Daniel Polotsky, Kristoffer Dayrit, Alan Gourevichand Benjamin Weiss. Based at ChicagoCoinFlip ranked 60th on the 2021 Inc. 5000 list as the highest ranked cryptocurrency company, was named the fastest growing company in 2021 Chicago by Crain’s and received the 2021 Silver Stevie ® Award for Customer Service. For more information about CoinFlip, please visit www.CoinFlip.tech.

COMPANY CONTACTS

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[email protected]718-608-4260

SOURCECoinFlip

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Cancel culture is very real in higher education. But its degree varies considerably https://chicago43rd.org/cancel-culture-is-very-real-in-higher-education-but-its-degree-varies-considerably/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 15:54:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/cancel-culture-is-very-real-in-higher-education-but-its-degree-varies-considerably/ youUniversity of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, Professor Lucas Mann recently argued in a paper for Slate that he has “never seen classrooms like mine in the pages of the Times” and notes that he sees students struggling to find their voice and certainly not out of “some sense of political fear and self -silence”. Mann’s experience as a […]]]>

youUniversity of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, Professor Lucas Mann recently argued in a paper for Slate that he has “never seen classrooms like mine in the pages of the Times” and notes that he sees students struggling to find their voice and certainly not out of “some sense of political fear and self -silence”. Mann’s experience as a professor at a southern Massachusetts regional school and not at an elite national research university is one where his “students work very hard to make others feel welcome because they go through the same process. They are, on the whole, much softer with each other’s ideas than with their own. In short, Mann suggests that the press and the national air focus on a few dozen elite schools that enroll a few hundred thousand students and not the millions that are enrolled elsewhere in more than 5,000 others. colleges and universities.

Professor Mann is absolutely correct in making any real distinctions about the country’s elite schools, but he is too quick to brush off the threat of cancel culture as an elite phenomenon and focus on his particular classrooms and not on the trials and tribulations outside the classrooms. The sad reality is that canceled culture and fear of speaking out is rampant on our college campuses, and diversity of viewpoints is no longer considered a sacred and fundamental value in higher education, albeit at times different degrees in various institutions of higher education. Students attending the country’s elite schools – those who are expected to thrive in the world of research, innovation and discovery – are actually more likely to try to cancel speech than their peers who attend lower-ranked educational institutions.

New data from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), RealClearEducation and College Pulse provide empirical insight into schools likely to try to shut down the floor. The survey captures the voices of more than 37,000 students at 159 colleges and paints a picture of college life in which shouting at speakers, preventing others from hearing diverse viewpoints and even resorting to violence to prevent speech are considered acceptable by many students.

Nationally, two-thirds of students think there are times when yelling at a loudspeaker can be justified. In the top 20 colleges and universities ranked by US News, which includes schools like Yale and Middlebury, nearly three-quarters (72%) of students say there are instances in which trying to disrupt a speaker is justifiable. At schools ranked below 100, like Texas Tech, the University of Central Florida, and regional schools like Professor Mann’s, the number drops to 62%.

Asked about the acceptability of preventing peers from attending a presentation on campus, 40% of students nationwide say there are times when preventing their classmates from hearing someone’s opinions another may be justified. In comparison, 50% of students in the top 20 schools think such behavior is justifiable. The numbers drop from there: 41% of those attending schools rated between 41 and 75, like Penn State and Syracuse University, think it’s okay to keep their peers from hearing a speaker. Just over a third (35%) of students enrolled in schools ranked below 100 — schools that include New Mexico State and Georgia State — believe there are instances in which to block their peers is acceptable.

Finally, almost a quarter (23%) of students in the country think that acts of violence could be justified to prevent speech. This alarming figure is even higher at elite colleges across the country. Thirty percent of students at the top 20 colleges and universities believe there are instances where violence is acceptable. The number drops notably for schools ranked below 100, which include the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Central Florida – where only 20% accept violence as a way to stop speaking, but the difference here is not huge between elite and non-elite.

The data is clear: the more elitist the school, the more likely its students are to want to silence speech. For elite, academically-minded schools, it’s not only a complete repudiation of their very mission and raison d’être, it’s also deeply saddening to watch as a teacher. The impulse to cancel in the name of awakened, identity-laden, progressive values ​​prevents students from growing and learning to connect with others in a world of real and worthwhile differences. But the lower-ranked regional schools aren’t perfect either; a significant number of these establishments are still open to speech closure, even though they are not ‘ivy tower’ schools. Far too many students will leave the halls of these schools thinking that shouting out ideas is acceptable and effective, and that it poses a real danger to higher education and society in general.

By coddling students and allowing woke administrators to set the agenda, schools are depriving students of a genuine educational experience – one that should be both joyful and, at times, uncomfortable; one filled with speeches, debates and ample speeches.

This article originally appeared on the AEIideas blog and is reproduced with the kind permission of the American Enterprise Institute.

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From ‘Bad Vegan’ to ‘King of the Hill,’ how pop culture diet foods ‘other’ https://chicago43rd.org/from-bad-vegan-to-king-of-the-hill-how-pop-culture-diet-foods-other/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/from-bad-vegan-to-king-of-the-hill-how-pop-culture-diet-foods-other/ At the climax of the Netflix docuseries “Bad Vegan,” restaurateur Sarma Melngailis is arrested at a Tennessee motel after her ex-partner Anthony Strangis orders Domino’s pizza, a transaction that alerts police to their whereabouts. At this point, the couple had warrants for their arrest after they allegedly got away with nearly $2 million in restaurant […]]]>

At the climax of the Netflix docuseries “Bad Vegan,” restaurateur Sarma Melngailis is arrested at a Tennessee motel after her ex-partner Anthony Strangis orders Domino’s pizza, a transaction that alerts police to their whereabouts. At this point, the couple had warrants for their arrest after they allegedly got away with nearly $2 million in restaurant funds and faced charges of felony tax evasion and a scheme to defraud investors.

The media, of course, had their heyday.

She was a woman who had built her career on the raw vegan food she sold through her favorite celebrity New York restaurant Pure Food and Wine and her juice bar One Lucky Duck – but she was knocked down by a pizza chain. The fact that it was actually Strangis’ food didn’t matter. Rather than shine a light on the alleged financial crimes, the tabloids and late-night TV latched onto the story of a hypocritical vegan — and the public (pardon the pun) ate it.

Related: From extreme catfishing to wine fraud, here are 13 documentaries about con artists

When I spoke with journalist Allen Salkin, whose Vanity Fair article on Melngailis served as the basis for the documentary, he noted this response.

“I’m not saying I think vegans think they’re better than us, but I think people think vegans think they are better than us,” he said. “And then people get mad at vegans.

He continued, “It’s almost like a guru sitting on a rock breathing and minding his own business trying to get in touch with a higher power, isn’t he? hurt anyone, but someone might look at it and say, ‘Hey, why are you judging me? That sounds silly, but I think it’s the same thing. [they are] judged by vegans.”

In pop culture and American culture in general, health foods have long been positioned as “other”. This perception was cemented during the countercultural movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

It is not a surprise. In pop culture and American culture in general, health foods have long been positioned as “other”. This perception was cemented during the countercultural movement of the 1960s and 1970s.

As author Jonathan Kauffman wrote in his book “Hippie Food: How Back-to-the-Landers, Longhairs, and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat,” many young Americans were rebelling against the growing industrialization in the United States. United, including in the military, by changing the way they eat. Pre-industrial foods – without boxes or plastics – like organic vegetables, sprouted grains and soy protein have become touchstones of the movement. Goodbye Wonder Bread and TV dinners, hello mung beans and carob.

“The idea that my personal food choices — what I buy, what I consume — can have these larger political impacts on world hunger, the environment, and capitalism,” Kauffman said in an interview with CUESA. “It was a huge change.”

Indeed, the idea that diet foods are actually “hippie food” has stuck, a correlation that has been depicted time and time again in film and television to the point of becoming an enduring trope. In November 2007, the “King of the Hill” episode “Raise the Steaks” aired for the first time. In it, Appleseed, Hank’s hippie acquaintance, convinces the Hills to try the CornuCO-OPia co-op after Hank is disappointed with the quality of steaks from the big box Mega Lo Mart. Unsurprisingly, the organic steaks and tomatoes are significantly better, which triggers a series of dilemmas for the main characters.

With a long gray beard, tie-dye shirt, and Spicoli-esque timbre to his voice, Appleseed is kind of a stereotypical hippie character. Fourteen years later, Netflix’s “Chicago Party Aunt” introduced viewers to Feather (voiced by Bob Odenkirk), a spacious juice shop owner who constantly peddles shots of wheatgrass and reframes body odor into natural pheromones. In many ways, it’s simply an updated Appleseed.

Along with these portrayals of people who sell or work in health food is the commercial positioning of health food as an aspiration, which is another way they appear to exist outside of the mainstream. Quickly scan Goop’s food section, for example, and you’ll find that the page is packed with descriptions of tubes of $60 smoothie “superpowders” and recipes staggered between advertisements for Tiffany and Co. In this context, health la food is like a diamond bracelet. It’s a frivolity or a luxury – something that’s largely unavailable to the masses.

I’m thinking of the “Broad City” episode where Ilana is told by her co-op manager that she hasn’t worked any of her hours for the current “lunar cycle”. If she doesn’t knock them all out at once, she’ll be banned from the co-op.

The bodega’s vegetables, which are readily available, are a punishment for hoi polloi, while the cooperative’s organic produce is reserved for those deemed worthy enough to enter.

Unfortunately, Ilana (Glazer) has an urgent doctor’s appointment that day, so Abbi (Jacobson) tries to help her find a workaround by impersonating Ilana for the day at the co-op to finish. his hours. Unfortunately, a hot co-op worker turns them in, and the disgruntled manager (played by Melissa Leo) lashes out, branding them SP (“sh**ty people”) and dooming them to a life of eating “bodega veggies.” ”

The bodega’s vegetables, which are readily available, are a punishment for hoi polloi, while the cooperative’s organic produce is reserved for those deemed worthy enough to enter. This idea of ​​who is “in” or “out” also gives rise to a pop culture depiction of restaurant or health food store staff that is distinct from the “dirty hippie” stereotype.

In this episode of “Broad City”, Abbi falls in love with Craig, an attractive, cooperative employee who loves Phish and art. He’s unlike any man Abbi has ever met “outside” the co-op, but she knows she’ll probably never see him again once she’s banished.


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This mimics the character from HBO’s “Bored to Death” that Jonathan Ames (Jason Schwartzman) falls for. In this series, Jenny Slate plays Stella, a co-op employee who is radically different from Jonathan’s ex-girlfriend, Suzanne (Olivia Thirlby). Where Suzanne was described as quite buttoned up, Stella has maniacal pixie dream girl vibes. She smokes weed, plays Nerf basketball, and offers Jonathan a threesome on the pretext that it’s “all love.”

And, in a case of life imitating art imitating life, the documentary “Bad Vegan” hints that actor Alec Baldwin, among others, was potentially infatuated with Melngailis. “My understanding of his relationship with Alec Baldwin is that he was a regular customer at the restaurant, and like many of the gentlemen who went there, he had a bit of a crush on Sarma,” Salkin said in the documentary.

In the actual coverage of the Melngailis case and in the fictional depictions of the people who create, sell, and market health food, it’s clear that America is still divided between being attracted and repelled by the culture surrounding “hippie food.” . That said, author Jonathan Kauffman points out the ways in which foods that were once considered countercultural are becoming more mainstream.

“What was really remarkable was looking at the 1970s and what nutritionists were saying about things like whole wheat bread and brown rice, and they were kind of making fun of the nutritional value of all those foods, until today, and the USDA nutritional values ​​guidelines recommend that we eat, you know, half of our grains should be whole grains,” he said in an interview with Here. & Now.”And I think that’s because this generation, their ideas about health were…there was a lot of rightness, and science ended up supporting them.”

However, it will likely be some time before our pop culture representations of who eats healthy foods — and who they are for (i.e., everyone) — finally change.

More vegan food stories:

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