Chicago education – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:30:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chicago43rd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Chicago education – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ 32 32 Fewer U.S. college graduates earn education degrees https://chicago43rd.org/fewer-u-s-college-graduates-earn-education-degrees/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 18:17:56 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/fewer-u-s-college-graduates-earn-education-degrees/ The coronavirus pandemic has brought a host of challenges for K-12 schools nationwide, including widespread reports of teacher shortages at the start of the new school year. But the problem of attracting people to the profession is not necessarily new. Even before the pandemic, there were signs of a “pipeline problem” among educators nationwide. The […]]]>

The coronavirus pandemic has brought a host of challenges for K-12 schools nationwide, including widespread reports of teacher shortages at the start of the new school year. But the problem of attracting people to the profession is not necessarily new. Even before the pandemic, there were signs of a “pipeline problem” among educators nationwide.

The number and share of new college graduates with bachelor’s degrees in education has declined over the past few decades, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). This has happened even as the total number and share of Americans with college degrees have increase.

To assess the decline in bachelor’s degrees in education conferred over time and differences in the experiences of young teachers, this analysis from the Pew Research Center uses federal data to analyze changes in these groups.

The analysis draws on more than three decades of data from the Integrated Post-Secondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the Survey National Survey of Teachers and Principals (NTPS), formerly Schools and Principal Survey (NTPS). Staff survey. The analysis of education credentials granted over time draws on five decades of IPEDS data on degree awards from all post-secondary institutions, which includes colleges, universities, and vocational and vocational schools.

The analysis of the age distribution of US teachers uses the most recent NTPS data available (school year 2017-2018). Data was not available for Maryland and the District of Columbia due to low response rates or data collection standards not being met. NTPS data includes full-time and part-time public school teachers.

In 2019-20, the most recent year for which data is available, colleges and universities awarded 85,057 Bachelor of Education degrees, or about 4% of the more than 2 million total degrees awarded that year. This is a 19% drop from 2000-2001, when colleges and universities awarded more than 105,000 Bachelor of Education degrees, or about 8% of all undergraduate degrees.

The decline is even more pronounced in the longer term. During the 1970-71 academic year, education was the most popular field for American undergraduate students. Colleges and universities awarded 176,307 bachelor’s degrees in education that year, or 21% of all degrees awarded.

Women, in particular, have become much less likely to choose education as a field of study. More than a third (36%) of all bachelor’s degrees awarded to women were in education in 1970-71. In 2019-20, only 6% of undergraduate degrees awarded to women were in education.

For both men and women, colleges and universities now award far more degrees in business and health professions (and related programs) than in education. Business and health degrees accounted for the two largest shares of all bachelor’s degrees awarded in 2019-20, at 19% and 13% of the total, respectively.

Although a considerable proportion of K-12 teachers have a bachelor’s degree in education, it is not always a requirement for the position as long as prospective teachers complete the necessary training and certifications. In addition to the decline in the number of college graduates receiving degrees in education, teacher education programs have seen a steep drop in enrollment in recent years. And 44% of American adults say they are not at all likely to encourage a young person to become a K-12 teacher, according to NORC at the University of Chicago.

Experts have raised several possibilities as to why fewer people are expressing interest in the profession, including high levels of stress and burnout, low salaries that have remained stagnant, and concerns about political and ideological arguments surrounding school curricula. .

With fewer college graduates earning degrees in education, young teachers have shrunk as a proportion of the nation’s entire elementary and secondary school teaching workforce. In 2017-18, the most recent school year for which NCES published data on this topic, 15% of all public and private K-12 teachers were under the age of 30, a slight down from 17% in the 1999-2000 school year.

During the same period, the share of older educators in the teaching profession has increased. Teachers aged 60 and older made up about 7% of K-12 instructors in 2017-18, more than double their share in 1999-2000, when they made up 3% of all teachers.

A graph showing that South Carolina and Kentucky have the highest proportions of teachers under 30

There are state-level differences in the age distribution of teachers — at least among public school educators. In the 2017-18 school year, 15% of all US public school teachers were under 30. In 28 states, they made up a share of teachers above the national average. The states with the highest proportion of teachers in their twenties were South Carolina (23%), Kentucky (21%), Louisiana, Arizona and North Carolina (all around 20%). Teachers under 30 made up the smallest share of the workforce in New Mexico (7%), Rhode Island (9%), Maine (9%), Nevada and California (about 10% each) . Maine, New Mexico and Alaska, by contrast, are the states with the oldest public school teachers — teachers 55 and older make up about a quarter of educators in each state.

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We must transform education to achieve SDG 4 goals: educator » Capital News https://chicago43rd.org/we-must-transform-education-to-achieve-sdg-4-goals-educator-capital-news/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 08:59:31 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/we-must-transform-education-to-achieve-sdg-4-goals-educator-capital-news/ By Griffin Asigo, Managing Director – Bridge Kenya NAIROBI, Kenya, 23 September – Earlier this week, the United Nations Secretary-General convened the Transforming Education Summit during the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly. The Summit saw several presentations from different Heads of State and Government on how they are transforming education in their […]]]>

By Griffin Asigo, Managing Director – Bridge Kenya

NAIROBI, Kenya, 23 September – Earlier this week, the United Nations Secretary-General convened the Transforming Education Summit during the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly.

The Summit saw several presentations from different Heads of State and Government on how they are transforming education in their countries.

Convened in response to a global education crisis – a crisis of equity and inclusion, quality and relevance, the Summit aimed to provide a unique opportunity to elevate education to the top of the global political agenda. and to mobilize action, ambition, solidarity and solutions to recoup pandemic-related learning losses and sow the seeds to transform education in a rapidly changing world.

The Kenyan delegation to the Summit presented a report and statement on education transformation which was prepared by the Ministry of Education in collaboration with partners through county and national level consultations with stakeholders education.

Stakeholders consulted included learners, teachers, parents, school leaders, the private sector, civil society organizations and youth TVET, universities and out-of-school individuals.

During the Summit, the delegation presented the reforms that have been implemented to establish an education system focused on relevance, equity and inclusion. More recently, the government launched the most comprehensive education reform since 1981, which saw the introduction of the Competency Based Curriculum (CBC). The objective of the CBC is to guarantee a basic education to each learner according to his abilities and needs.

According to the United Nations, education today is in complete upheaval. More than 90% of the world’s children have seen their education interrupted by the pandemic – the biggest disruption to education systems in history.

For many learners, especially girls, this pause can become permanent, with potential consequences for their future and for future generations that follow. The pandemic has also revealed great disparities not only between countries, but particularly between different groups of learners within countries.

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Students from Bridge Academy’s Mukuru School collaborate during a lesson/Bridge Academy

The pandemic has caused unprecedented disruption to social, economic and cultural life across the world. When educational institutions closed in Kenya in March 2020, nearly 18 million learners were affected, threatening the massive learning gains the country has made over the past decade.

A handful of innovative initiatives in the country have bridged the gap during the pandemic. A standout example is Bridge@Home, which has enabled hundreds of students in well-served and underserved communities to learn through more than 800 WhatsApp virtual classrooms and an interactive mobile-phone quiz system available to students. students from urban and hard-to-reach areas.

Before the pandemic, the world was already grappling with the learning crisis with 70% of 10-year-olds, mostly from developing countries, unable to read and understand simple text. Today, the World Bank estimates that the learning losses caused by the covid-19 pandemic are the greatest in global education for a century.

As the UN Secretary-General calls on countries to transform their education systems to meet the demands of the modern age, these are school providers in the country who have been practicing transformative education models for over a decade. now.

Academies like Bridge International Academies have leveraged innovation and technology to scale up learning for children in underserved communities.

The learning results were excellent. Since 2015, tens of thousands of Bridge students have excelled in national exams and earned places in some of the top national schools in the country. Today, the Bridge model has been widely replicated and underpins public education transformation programs supporting over one million children a day across Africa.

Confirming this pattern, a recent independent study by Professor Michael Kremer of the University of Chicago found that freshmen at Bridge International Academies are more than three times more likely to be able to read than their peers at other schools.

The study reveals that after two years, primary students at Bridge International Academies have almost an extra year of learning ahead of children taught using standard methods. For pre-primary students, children gain almost an extra year and a half, learning in two years what children in other schools learn in three and a half years.

Professor Michael Kremer’s study shows that the Bridge methodology has the potential to produce dramatic learning gains at scale and can be the solution to learning poverty if widely replicated.

To sustainably transform education, teachers must be at the heart of the transformation. The World Bank has called on countries to focus on the most important aspect of learning; teachers – calling on governments to ensure teachers are well supported.

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Bridge believes that improving teacher well-being and professional development is key to achieving excellent learning outcomes. With a data-driven approach, teachers and school leaders have technological tools to learn and develop their skills.

Each teacher receives tailor-made training. This training is followed by an ongoing personal development program. Learning and Development Coaches conduct live lesson observations and use them to provide teachers with practical insights on how to make their lessons even more impactful.

Innovation and technology are likely to play the most important role in transforming and building resilient education systems in modern times.

Embracing innovation and technology in education has the ability to build stronger education systems to reach more children, improve learning and teaching, and build resilience for withstand shocks such as Covid-19 disruptions. Now more than ever, it is time to transform our education in order to achieve the targets of SDG 4.

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Education Northwest to Lead Washington State’s New Family Engagement Center https://chicago43rd.org/education-northwest-to-lead-washington-states-new-family-engagement-center/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:51:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/education-northwest-to-lead-washington-states-new-family-engagement-center/ PORTLAND, OR, USA, Sept. 20, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Education Northwest is thrilled to announce that it and several valued partners have received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education to establish a Family Engagement Center statewide in Washington State. The grant is one of eight awarded by the department and provides $5 million over […]]]>

PORTLAND, OR, USA, Sept. 20, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Education Northwest is thrilled to announce that it and several valued partners have received a grant from the U.S. Department of Education to establish a Family Engagement Center statewide in Washington State.

The grant is one of eight awarded by the department and provides $5 million over five years to establish the center, a collaboration between Education Northwest, the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI), the Community Center for Education Results (CCER), Roots of Inclusion and the Washington State Family and Community Engagement Trust.

NORC, an independent, nonpartisan research institution at the University of Chicago, will serve as the external evaluator of the new center.

The center will be led by Education Northwest, and the entire collaboration will ensure that the work fully aligns with the emerging family engagement policy framework and infrastructure across Washington State.

The center’s community partners – CCER, Roots of Inclusion, and Washington State Family and Community Engagement Trust – will provide connections and information about their own work with families and educators in Washington, including sharing their expertise, training and tools throughout the state.

“The center will play a vital role in ensuring that families and educators share a voice in student well-being and success,” said Timothy Speth, leader at Education Northwest and co-director of the Washington Statewide Family Engagement Center. “This comes at a critical time for public education, as schools and districts across the country seek to support school resumption and meet the developmental needs of students in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. ”

The team will conduct its work based on the Washington Equity and Shared Responsibility Framework, the Department of Education Equity Framework, and culturally appropriate lenses developed from decades of collective experience among partners.

“Washington State has laid the foundation for a systemic, collaborative, and coordinated approach to family engagement statewide,” Speth said. “The new center will build on this foundation and place family, community involvement and multiple levels of equity at the center of this effort.

“Families are essential partners in a student’s journey to success,” said Sarah Butcher, director of Roots of Inclusion. “There is no longer an important time for schools to engage, partner and work with our families. The Washington Statewide Family Engagement Center will provide increased resources, technical assistance and a strict focus on building, repairing and nurturing meaningful partnerships with families Our school communities need it, our families want it, and the success and well-being of every young person demands it.

Education Northwest was founded in 1966 as a nonprofit organization committed to advancing equity in education. We use evidence to help our partners address educational challenges and improve learning.

Ilona Wall
Northwest Education
+15032759485 ext.
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
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United States Department of Education Honors Christ the King School as 2022 National Blue Ribbon Recipient – Press Releases https://chicago43rd.org/united-states-department-of-education-honors-christ-the-king-school-as-2022-national-blue-ribbon-recipient-press-releases/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 01:34:19 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/united-states-department-of-education-honors-christ-the-king-school-as-2022-national-blue-ribbon-recipient-press-releases/ Catholic schools located in the Archdiocese have received 120 Blue Ribbon Awards. Chicago, (September 16, 2022) – The Archdiocese of Chicago announced today that Christ The King School, in the Beverly neighborhood of Chicago, has was recognized this year by the US Department of Education with a Blue Ribbon Award. The National Blue Ribbon Award […]]]>

Catholic schools located in the Archdiocese have received 120 Blue Ribbon Awards.

Chicago, (September 16, 2022) – The Archdiocese of Chicago announced today that Christ The King School, in the Beverly neighborhood of Chicago, has was recognized this year by the US Department of Education with a Blue Ribbon Award. The National Blue Ribbon Award is given to a school based on its overall academic excellence or progress in closing student achievement gaps. Catholic schools in the Archdiocese have received 120 Blue Ribbon Awards.

“We are very proud of the Christ the King school community for receiving this coveted award,” said Greg Richmond, superintendent of the Chicago Catholic Schools Archdiocese. “I commend the school administration, educators and staff for their unwavering dedication to their students and families.

Christ the King School has been recognized in the category of “Exemplary High-Performing Schools,” meaning the schools are among the top-performing schools in the state, as measured by state ratings or nationally standardized tests. This is the first time the school has been honored with a National Blue Ribbon Award. Dr. Ann Marie Riordan, principal of Christ the King School, will join other recipients at a two-day awards ceremony in Washington, DC, in November.

U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona today recognized a total of 297 schools as National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2022.

“I congratulate all of the 2022 National Blue Ribbon School Award recipients for creating vibrant, welcoming, and empowering school communities where students can learn, grow, reach their potential, and fulfill their dreams,” Secretary Cardona said. “As our country continues to recover from the pandemic, we know that our future will only be as strong as the education we provide to all of our children. Blue Ribbon schools have gone above and beyond to keep students safe. healthy and safe while respecting their , social, emotional and mental health.These schools show what is possible to make a lasting and positive difference in the lives of students.

With its 39th cohort, the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program has awarded approximately 10,000 awards to more than 9,000 schools. The National Blue Ribbon School award affirms and validates the hard work of students, educators, families, and communities in their efforts to — and to achieve — exemplary achievement.

Up to 420 schools can be nominated each year. The department invites nominations for the National Blue Ribbon Schools Award from the highest education official of all states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories, the Department of Educational Activity of the Department of Defense, and the Bureau of Indian education. Private schools are named by the Council for American Private Education.

To learn more about Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Chicago, visit: schools.archchicago.org

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Students use Pollinate to sell class time slots https://chicago43rd.org/students-use-pollinate-to-sell-class-time-slots/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/students-use-pollinate-to-sell-class-time-slots/ The common problem of oversubscribed courses at American universities has met with a possible match in a few University of Chicago students trying to arrange slot sales to willing bidders. The students, both senior economists in Chicago, say they are already holding student-pair sales at nearby Illinois University in Chicago and Cornell University, hoping to […]]]>

The common problem of oversubscribed courses at American universities has met with a possible match in a few University of Chicago students trying to arrange slot sales to willing bidders.

The students, both senior economists in Chicago, say they are already holding student-pair sales at nearby Illinois University in Chicago and Cornell University, hoping to expand it further.

The system, called Pollinate, involves a computer program that continuously checks each targeted university’s database for class openings, in response to a chronic demand that too many institutions have failed to meet enough, the agency said. one of the creative students, Jonathan Merril.

“If we can somehow figure out how to fix it for one or two early on, and we can provide a great level of service,” Mr. Merril said, “then we can kind of see doing it for many more universities.”

Some administrators and students at the institutions initially affected — including the University of Chicago itself — acknowledged the underlying concern, but predicted that finding and selling course slots through Pollinate would ultimately prove technically and legally impractical. .

Yet, in many cases, American universities do not offer better solutions. One of the most chronically overcrowded systems is the University of California system, where reported individual course slot sales in recent years have reached $300 (£260).

The attempt by Mr. Merril and his partner, Jack Ogle, to formalize the process appears “to start with good intentions,” said Robert Dixon, registrar at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

“But that’s not feasible,” Mr Dixon said, “because they would have to work with live data from our student information system, and we don’t have real-time data that is publicly available. on the number of places available. . ”

This is largely because the UIC has had its own experience of students with computer skills trying such things to help themselves or a few friends, Mr Dixon said. The constant automated queries harmed other students by slowing down the university’s IT services, so UIC hid its course availability data.

UIC’s Mr Dixon and a spokesperson for the University of Chicago said their institutions also had student code of conduct rules that would hinder such practices, including a ban on enrolling in classes that a student does not plan to take.

And at Cornell, several students have begun protesting Pollinate via social media, calling it another tool to disadvantage low-income students who are already struggling.

Mr. Merril acknowledged this type of possible harm. But he said the limited course availability is already hurting those with the least flexibility in their lives. He said students trading class slots on Pollinate paid an average of only $30, and he cited the case of a student hoping to save money by commuting with his sister who would gladly pay that. amount so that they can align their schedules.

UIC shares these concerns, said Mr Dixon. He realizes, he said, that many students and faculty prefer midday and midweek classes. But he insists on a wider spread throughout each day and week to help more students create their schedules, and he carefully monitors enrollment choices in the spring and summer to optimize class availability for the fall, he said.

Yet many American universities, including UIC, routinely have instances where students have to wait impatiently until their junior or senior years—when they finally get top selection preferences—to take courses that make integral part of their majors.

Mr Merril said he was agnostic about whether Pollinate would eventually gravitate towards a system where students pay to get into a needed class, or whether exchanges work some other way. “It’s okay,” he says, “it doesn’t have to be about money. But there is no solution at the moment for a student who really wants to enter a class – he is not able to choose to spend a little money, or to try to enter it somehow. way, other than to plead and beg the administration.”

Exceptions to general waiting lists for courses at UIC are very rare, Mr Dixon said, usually involving athletes due to their frequent travel; those with a certified disability; and, by state law, veterans. Students in arrears may also be excluded, he said.

“We try to keep this to the bare minimum possible,” he said of course enrollment preferences, “because it creates divisions within a campus community.”

paul.basken@timeshighereducation.com

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The Gilead Foundation awards $20 million to organizations that advance health through education and equity https://chicago43rd.org/the-gilead-foundation-awards-20-million-to-organizations-that-advance-health-through-education-and-equity/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 15:03:58 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/the-gilead-foundation-awards-20-million-to-organizations-that-advance-health-through-education-and-equity/ Gilead Sciences, a biopharmaceutical company, announced that its nonprofit, The Gilead Foundation, has provided $20 million to 13 organizations to support creative, high-impact strategies that advance health through science. education and equity. “Through the work of the Gilead Foundation, 13 organizations have been selected as inaugural recipients of the Creating Possible Fund, who are national […]]]>

Gilead Sciences, a biopharmaceutical company, announced that its nonprofit, The Gilead Foundation, has provided $20 million to 13 organizations to support creative, high-impact strategies that advance health through science. education and equity.

“Through the work of the Gilead Foundation, 13 organizations have been selected as inaugural recipients of the Creating Possible Fund, who are national leaders, thinkers and changemakers in the fields of education, health and racial equity, adolescent mental health and social justice,” said Korab Zuka, President of the Gilead Foundation and Vice President, Public Affairs, Gilead Sciences. “We know that health inequalities stem from broader structural inequalities that are deeply embedded in our society, our laws, our economy and especially our education systems. With the help of leaders in education and health, we believe we have chosen a group of health equity innovators who will have a meaningful impact on society.

A d

Subsidized organizations:

● Brown University (Annenberg Institute for School Reform), Providence, Rhode Island

● Oakland Kingmakers, Oakland, California

● KQED, San Francisco, California

● Morehouse College, Center of Excellence in Education, Atlanta, Georgia

● Oakland Fund for Public Innovation, Oakland, California

● New lifelines for young people, Milpitas, California

● Impulse of perseverance, Chicago, Ill.

● Represent Justice, Los Angeles, California

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● South Center for Poverty Law, Montgomery, Alabama

● St. John’s Community Health/Compton Unified School District, Los Angeles, California

● The Trevor Inc. Project, West Hollywood, California

● Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, Louisiana

● YELLOW, Virginia Beach, Virginia

For more information about the Gilead Foundation, visit https://www.gilead.com/purpose/giving/gilead-foundation.

Copyright 2022 by KPRC Click2Houston – All Rights Reserved.

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Education Fair in Mumbai on September 12 https://chicago43rd.org/education-fair-in-mumbai-on-september-12/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 16:47:37 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/education-fair-in-mumbai-on-september-12/ Yocket, India’s community-based digital platform for study abroad applicants, in collaboration with the US Commerce Service (part of the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration) as part of the Trade Mission of Education in India, will hold Physical Education Fairs in Mumbai on 12th September 2022 at St Regis Hotel and in Delhi on […]]]>

Yocket, India’s community-based digital platform for study abroad applicants, in collaboration with the US Commerce Service (part of the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration) as part of the Trade Mission of Education in India, will hold Physical Education Fairs in Mumbai on 12th September 2022 at St Regis Hotel and in Delhi on 15th September 2022 at Imperial Hotel. Timings will be 5:00-7:00 PM IST for both events. Students can register for the event online through the official website and offline during the event itself.

The two-hour event aims to aid in the decision-making process of students wishing to study in the United States for higher education by bringing together a wide range of industry leaders who can share their experiences.

Students will be able to get advice from more than 20 representatives from universities in California, New York, Chicago, Texas and other parts of the United States. Universities include University of Virginia, Stony Brook University, Pennsylvania State University, Seattle City University, and many more.

Attendees can attend live training seminars by experts, student visa briefings by the U.S. Consulate General VISA, and interact with U.S. Trade Services officials as well as Yocket co-founders and advisors . This will help participants resolve their concerns regarding the proper admission test, application processes, attractive scholarships, career advancement opportunities, profile building, and funding.

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South Shore Line to Promote Education and Awareness During Rail Safety Week https://chicago43rd.org/south-shore-line-to-promote-education-and-awareness-during-rail-safety-week/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 05:40:23 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/south-shore-line-to-promote-education-and-awareness-during-rail-safety-week/ In partnership with Indiana Operation Lifesaver, the South Shore Line will once again participate in National Rail Safety Week, taking place September 19-23, during which their crews will continue to educate the surrounding communities in which they operate about the railway safety. During Rail Safety Week, SSL representatives will be on hand at Millennium Station […]]]>

In partnership with Indiana Operation Lifesaver, the South Shore Line will once again participate in National Rail Safety Week, taking place September 19-23, during which their crews will continue to educate the surrounding communities in which they operate about the railway safety.

During Rail Safety Week, SSL representatives will be on hand at Millennium Station and September 21 in East Chicago throughout the morning with train and crossing safety educational materials, answering any questions. and distributing listening to commuters’ safety concerns. The lightning bolts are part of ongoing efforts to raise awareness of the importance of safe behavior around trains and tracks.

The South Shore Line reports that “Trespassing on railroad property is the leading cause of all railroad-related deaths in the United States. It is essential that we continue to educate the public about the risks associated with trespassing near train tracks or disregarding the laws that have been put in place for the safety of those on board the train as well as those of our community,” said commented Kristen Costlet, director. from security and rules to SSL. “Passenger rail service is a positive and safe means of transportation in our communities and for our users. We will continue to do whatever it takes to better educate and enforce rail safety measures to prevent and hopefully eliminate accidents along the railroad.
Rail Safety programs include free presentations by licensed volunteers at schools, civic and community organizations, as well as specialized training for law enforcement, professional drivers and emergency first responders.

The South Shore Line went on to say, “In our increasingly distracted society, people are often wearing headphones and drivers are talking or texting while driving, making South Shore Line’s mission paramount in raising awareness. to safety. We provide the information they need to stay safe around property and railway rights-of-way through our programs and by participating in National Rail Safety Week by hosting blitzes at passenger stations. Our programs and contact with our passengers provide valuable train information, illustrate how drivers can safely navigate crossings, and reinforce that it is illegal and dangerous to walk or use train tracks at recreational purposes. Our successful partnerships with rail safety advocates in the rail industry and at the state, federal and local levels help reduce collisions through education, enforcement and advances in engineering.

The SSL says these safety flashes allow them to contact passengers directly to ensure they understand the need to remain vigilant about safety around the railway.

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Seattle cancels first day of school as teachers go on strike | Education News https://chicago43rd.org/seattle-cancels-first-day-of-school-as-teachers-go-on-strike-education-news/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 16:36:45 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/seattle-cancels-first-day-of-school-as-teachers-go-on-strike-education-news/ Classes in Seattle, Wash., have been canceled on what would have been the first day of school this fall for tens of thousands of students as teachers strike over wages, health support mental health and staffing ratios for special education and multilingual students. Jennifer Matter, president of the Seattle Education Association, a union representing more […]]]>

Classes in Seattle, Wash., have been canceled on what would have been the first day of school this fall for tens of thousands of students as teachers strike over wages, health support mental health and staffing ratios for special education and multilingual students.

Jennifer Matter, president of the Seattle Education Association, a union representing more than 6,000 teachers, paraprofessionals and office workers, said 95% of its members who submitted a ballot voted to strike Wednesday. Contract talks continued.

“Nobody wants to strike,” Matter said. “But the SPS [Seattle Public Schools] left us no choice. We can’t go back to the way things were.

The Seattle School District said in an email to parents that it was “optimistic that the negotiating teams will reach a positive solution for students, staff and families.”

Seattle’s is the latest in a wave of teacher strikes across the United States that have resumed after many schools were suspended during the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic has put extraordinary pressure on teachers and students. Federal stimulus money has helped stabilize school district budgets. Teachers’ unions have tried to seize the opportunity to voice their concerns and win better salaries and more resources for students and teachers after a few difficult years.

A union member proudly strikes with her homemade sign as part of a district-wide teachers’ strike outside Whetstone High School in Columbus, Ohio on Wednesday, August 24, 2022 [File: Samantha Hendrickson/AP Photo]

High inflation, a national teacher shortage and the goodwill of teachers through their pandemic schooling efforts bolster all union efforts, said Bradley Marianno, assistant professor of educational policy at the University of Nevada at Vegas.

“By all accounts, school budgets are looking pretty good right now,” Marianno said. “As teachers’ union contracts expire, they’re looking for new deals that essentially send more funding to teachers and more funding to students.”

The Seattle Teachers Union in a Twitter post late Tuesday night wrote, “The District must meet the needs of students NOW! Our negotiating team is still at the table and we are still working on an agreement. »

The strike means the cancellation of the first day of school for 47,000 Seattle students in the district, the state’s largest public school system. Teachers are expected to march in picket lines at several of the system’s 110 schools on Wednesday.

The school district said it will serve meals to students at several schools and that extracurricular activities will continue during the work stoppage.

The Seattle strike followed a four-day strike by teachers in Columbus, Ohio two weeks ago over class sizes and guaranteed air conditioning in classrooms.

Teachers in Columbus — Ohio’s largest school district — ended the strike last week, agreeing to a package that included 4% raises, building improvement plans, reduced class sizes and innovative paid leave.

In Denver, Colorado, marathon bargaining sessions last week resulted in a tentative agreement for an 8.7% raise for educators, higher pay for first-grade teachers and more money from the district for health insurance costs.

Teachers in Minneapolis, Chicago and Sacramento also exited earlier this year before securing new contracts.

What Seattle Teachers Demand

The Seattle union said it opposes school district efforts to eliminate staffing ratios for special education students, arguing that the bulk of the work will fall to general education teachers and to special education teachers.

The union also said the district’s proposals would make general education teachers more accountable for supporting multilingual students.

In a video released by the union, speech therapist Julie Salazar said she voted to allow the strike because the workload for her and other special education staff was too high.

“We can’t serve our children well and everyone knows that,” she said.

Meanwhile, the Seattle School District has offered additional 1% wage increases on top of the 5.5% cost-of-living increase set by state lawmakers — far less than what the union had said it wanted — plus one-time bonuses for some teachers, including $2,000 for Seattle third-grade teachers who earn an English or dual-language endorsement.

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More and more children are repeating. Is it good for them? | Education https://chicago43rd.org/more-and-more-children-are-repeating-is-it-good-for-them-education/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/more-and-more-children-are-repeating-is-it-good-for-them-education/ Brooke Schultz and Heather Hollingsworth Associated Press/Report for America As Braylon Price remembers, he struggled with just about everything the first full school year of the pandemic. With minimal guidance and frequent disruptions, he struggled to keep up with his homework and complete his assignments on time. It was so difficult that his parents asked […]]]>

Brooke Schultz and Heather Hollingsworth Associated Press/Report for America

As Braylon Price remembers, he struggled with just about everything the first full school year of the pandemic. With minimal guidance and frequent disruptions, he struggled to keep up with his homework and complete his assignments on time.

It was so difficult that his parents asked him to repeat sixth grade – a decision they credit with putting him on a better path.

“At first I didn’t really want to do it,” said Braylon, now 13. “But later in the year I thought it would probably be better for me if I did.”

The number of students retained for a school year has increased across the country. Traditionally, experts have said that repeating a grade can harm children’s social life and academic future. But many parents, empowered by new pandemic-era laws, have called for changes to help their children recover from the tumult of remote learning, quarantines and school staffing shortages.

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Twenty-four of the 28 states that provided data for the most recent academic year saw an increase in the number of retained students, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. Three states — South Carolina, West Virginia and Delaware — saw retention more than double.

Pennsylvania, where the Price family lives, passed a pandemic-era law allowing parents to choose to have their children redone. The following year, the number of students retained in the state jumped from about 20,000, to over 45,000 students.

Braylon’s mother does not regret having taken advantage of the new law.

“The best decision we could have made for him,” said Kristi Price, who lives in Bellefonte, central Pennsylvania.

While the two girls in the family managed to keep up with school despite limited supervision, Braylon struggled. He returned to school in person for the first full school year of the pandemic, but it was “tasteless”, his mother said. Students have been quarantined from time to time, and teachers have tried to keep pace with students learning at home, online and in hybrid models. That winter, Braylon suffered a wrestling spinal cord injury that forced him to return to distance learning.

During his sixth grade rehearsal, Braylon had an individualized education program that helped him focus more. Having more individual attention from teachers also helped. Socially, he said the transition was easy, as most of his friends were in lower grades or had previously attended different schools.

Research in the world of education has been critical in getting students to repeat grades.

The risk is that students who have been retained have a double risk of dropping out, said Arthur Reynolds, a professor at the Human Capital Research Collaborative at the University of Minnesota, citing studies of students in Chicago and Baltimore.

“Kids see it as punishment,” Reynolds said. “It reduces their academic motivation and it does not increase their educational advancement.”

But retention proponents say none of the research was conducted in a pandemic, when many children struggled with Zoom lessons and some stopped going online altogether.

“So many kids have struggled and had so many problems,” said Florida State Senator Lori Berman, a Democrat from Delray Beach. Berman drafted legislation to make it easier for parents to ask K-5 students to repeat a 2021-22 school year. “I don’t think there’s any stigma in holding your child back at this point.”

Generally, parents can request that children be retained, but the final decision rests with principals, who make decisions based on factors such as academic progress. California and New Jersey have also passed laws making it easier for parents to require their children to repeat a grade, although the option only became available last year.

In suburban Kansas City, Celeste Roberts decided last year to hold another round of sophomores for her son, who she says was struggling even before the pandemic. When virtual learning was a failure, he spent the year learning at a slower pace with his grandmother, a retired teacher who bought goats to keep things fun.

Roberts said repeating the year helped his son academically and his friends barely noticed him.

“Even with peers, some of them were like, ‘Wait, shouldn’t you be in third year?’ And he’s just like, ‘Well, I didn’t go to school because of COVID,'” she said. “And they’re kind of like, ‘OK, cool.’ You know, they move on. It’s not a thing. So it’s been really great socially. Even with parent circles. Everyone’s like, ‘Great. Do what your kid has to do.’ “

Ultimately, there shouldn’t be just two options for repeating a grade or moving on to the next, said Alex Lamb, who has studied research on grade repetition through his work with the Center for Education, Policy Analysis, Research and Evaluation at the University of Connecticut to help advise school districts.

“None of these options are good,” she said. “A great option is to let students move on and then introduce some of these supports that are research-backed, effective, and enable academic and social-emotional growth for students and then for communities.”

In the Fox Chapel Area School District in Pennsylvania, two students were held back at the request of educators, while eight families decided that their students would repeat a grade. Six others discussed the new legislation with the school and ultimately decided not to retain their students.

“As a school district, we take retention very seriously,” Superintendent Mary Catherine Reljac said. She said the district involves parents, a team of educators, school counselors and principals to help decide what’s best for each child.

Price says retaining Braylon helped him get an Individualized Education Program, or IEP. The special education plan gave him more support as he navigated sixth grade again. When he thinks about the difference between rounds one and two of sixth grade, Braylon said he felt the extra support was instrumental, noting that he sometimes likes having one-on-one help from teachers.

“In online school, you weren’t really doing that,” he said. “You did the job and then you gave it back.”

He doesn’t want to be given the answer, he says, but guided enough that he can figure it out for himself.

“I think because of the pandemic, we as parents could see how much he was struggling and we could recognize that he was barely keeping his head above water and that he had need more help to be successful on his,” Price said.

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