Chicago education – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:55:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chicago43rd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Chicago education – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ 32 32 Illinois Develops New Equity-Based Higher Education Funding Formula https://chicago43rd.org/illinois-develops-new-equity-based-higher-education-funding-formula/ Thu, 12 May 2022 11:12:01 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/illinois-develops-new-equity-based-higher-education-funding-formula/ Thus, each university, which has a seat on the commission, is required to push for a disclaimer to ensure that its budgets will not fall below current levels. In this scenario, the formula would only be applied to new government funds allocated above an established base funding level, much like what happened when the formula […]]]>

Thus, each university, which has a seat on the commission, is required to push for a disclaimer to ensure that its budgets will not fall below current levels. In this scenario, the formula would only be applied to new government funds allocated above an established base funding level, much like what happened when the formula for K-12 schools was created. in 2017. This means lawmakers must approve much greater spending on higher education to advance equity goals.

A look at the U of I’s South Campus reveals the difficult nuances of designing a formula. While the university enrolls the second-largest number of black undergraduates — 2,120 out of 33,001 undergraduates in fall 2020 — they make up the smallest percentage of its total student body at just 6.4 percent. , according to data provided by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. Northern Illinois University enrolled slightly more black students at 2,355, but they make up nearly 20% of the school’s undergraduates.

The University of Illinois at Chicago is arguably in a better position. About 34% of students are Hispanic and 21% identify as Asian or Pacific Islander.

Chicago State University and Governor’s State University currently have the highest proportions of black students, at 72% and 38%, respectively. But they serve fewer students overall and receive the least state funding.

Of the more than $1.2 billion allocated to higher education in next year’s state budget, more than half ($655 million) went to the University system. Illinois. The combined 57,283 undergraduate students at its three campuses represent about 45.6% of all undergraduate students in the state, according to IBHE data. For their operating budgets, the Governor’s State received $24.4 million, the State of Chicago received $36.8 million, and Northern Illinois University received $92.2 million.

U of I has said little publicly about its position on a funding formula and has not made anyone available for an interview.

Deputy Governor for Education Martin Torres said the formula’s recommendations are not expected to go to the General Assembly until 2025.

If the formula takes minority enrollment into account, it will almost certainly also link funding to outcomes—retention and graduation rates.

Urbana-Champaign leads the pack when it comes to looking at the numbers in isolation. According to an analysis by the Partnership for College Completion, a Chicago-based nonprofit that advocates for equity, the U of I’s flagship campus awarded 481 bachelor’s degrees to black students last year, followed by UIC with 383 and Northern Illinois with 330.

But for U of I, that meant only 6% and 8% of all bachelor’s degrees were awarded to black students at the Urbana-Champaign and Chicago campuses, respectively. Chicago State awarded 224 degrees to black graduates, which accounted for 71% of the school’s total degrees.

Chicago State President Zaldwaynaka “Z” Scott said his school, which relies on state appropriations as its primary source of revenue, would benefit from an equity-based formula because there are additional costs for academic and social supports to help students with high needs progress. For example, the school offers a five-week introductory college course called Rise Academy, which gives full tuition and fees to freshmen who complete it. They are more likely to stay in school than students who do not follow the program.

“I won’t have to make the choice to fix the roof or fix the pipe over hiring another advisor or training another advisor because that expense was factored into the funding formula,” said said Scott.

Proponents say state funding for university operating budgets — which has declined significantly in real and adjusted terms since its peak of $1.5 billion in 2002 — should not be viewed as a sum game nothing. As state funding dwindled, schools raised tuition to make up the difference, discouraging low-income students from attending and sending residents to cheaper out-of-state universities, where they stay and contribute to the economy.

“Everyone will need to think beyond their own immediate self-interest and work together toward bigger goals that can lead to more equitable outcomes for students,” says Lisa Castillo Richmond, executive director of the Partnership for College Completion. “If everyone fights back, our students could end up worse off.”

Adam Schuster, vice president of policy at the libertarian-leaning Illinois Policy Institute, says he supports the goal of making the university more accessible, but warns that a formula favoring specific racial groups could lead to legal challenges, like the affirmative action cases that have landed in the United States. Supreme Court.

“If there’s a way to achieve greater equity and outcomes that don’t require racial discrimination in the process,” he says, “it might actually be more efficient and less controversial.”

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Campaign volunteers are a good source for voter education https://chicago43rd.org/campaign-volunteers-are-a-good-source-for-voter-education/ Tue, 10 May 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/campaign-volunteers-are-a-good-source-for-voter-education/ In June, we will vote in the primary election. It is a privilege and a responsibility that most patriots hold sacred. One of the easiest ways to find out more about your candidates is to listen to what their volunteers have to say when they contact you by phone. By donating just a few minutes […]]]>

In June, we will vote in the primary election. It is a privilege and a responsibility that most patriots hold sacred.

One of the easiest ways to find out more about your candidates is to listen to what their volunteers have to say when they contact you by phone. By donating just a few minutes of your time, you have the opportunity to get your questions answered and to know where your candidate stands on the issues that impact your life the most.

This knowledge is a valuable tool for making an informed decision.

Unfortunately, far too many voters do not want to waste time. The volunteers who work for their candidates volunteer their time to ensure that our elections are conducted with a peaceful transfer of power. Responding to them with indifference, hostility, and impertinence may temporarily ease the frustration we feel, but it won’t do much to ensure a positive outcome.

SEND LETTERS TO: letters@suntimes.com. We want to hear from our readers. To be considered for publication, letters must include your full name, neighborhood or hometown, and a phone number for verification purposes. Letters should be a maximum of approximately 350 words.

Will you give them the courtesy of your attention to arm yourself with information about their candidate’s priorities, or will you be the first to complain when another incompetent has been elected? Those few minutes can be the highlight of your day.

Isie Barclay, St Charles

Enlarge the Supreme Court

Nowhere in the Constitution does it say that we must have nine justices on the Supreme Court. Nor would it take a constitutional amendment to add more seats. In fact, Congress has expanded the Supreme Court many times throughout American history.

Congress should use its constitutional authority to rebalance the Supreme Court, which has been taken over by a supermajority that holds extreme views outside the mainstream of legal thought and out of step with most Americans. Congress must pass the Justice Act of 2021, which would add four seats to the Supreme Court and help stem attacks by the right-wing supermajority on our basic freedoms, including the right to access abortion care.

Nothing prevents Congress from adding judges, except political will, of course. I urge Congress to pass the Judiciary Act of 2021 and add four seats to the Supreme Court.

Emilia Pascu, Mount Prospect

Hidden motives of the anti-abortion movement

In her Mother’s Day column on ‘Roe’s reversal perspective’, Mary Mitchell said: ‘Yet I don’t believe that even the most diehard ‘right to life’ proponents want to see women and girls put their lives at risk trying to terminate an intended pregnancy.

I do not believe it one second. For some, even an unwanted pregnancy is the result of “sin”, and the sinner must bear the consequences of her act, whether it simply ruins her life (depriving her of educational or career opportunities, etc.) physical injury or death.

A proof of this is that the strict anti-abortion laws do not allow the termination of a pregnancy, even in cases of rape or incest. In this context, it should be recalled that a standard defense in many rape trials is that the victim somehow “wanted” or “invited” the sexual encounter.

It should also be remembered that some of the strongest anti-abortionists are also opposed to sex education in schools and opposed to allowing the distribution of contraceptives. The bottom line is to deny women access to education and reproductive health care, and then punish them if they become pregnant.

I do not want to trivialize the moral aspects of this contentious debate. But I don’t believe the “sanctity of life” is protected by the bombing of Planned Parenthood clinics or the killing of doctors who perform abortions, both have happened.

Too many staunch “pro-life” supporters refer to all “pro-choice” supporters as “pro-abortion”, which is simply not true. Some of us believe that “freedom” does not mean the freedom to impose our values ​​on everyone.

Mitchell wrote that the difficult issue of abortion was something “we don’t talk about”. Now is the time for some of the more unfortunate aspects of the anti-abortion movement to be discussed.

Charles Berg, Hyde Park/Kenwood

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Jefferson County Board of Education announced new principals https://chicago43rd.org/jefferson-county-board-of-education-announced-new-principals/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:11:26 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/jefferson-county-board-of-education-announced-new-principals/ By Vallean Jackson, For La Tribune JEFFERSON COUNTY — The Jefferson County School Board held a mandatory public board meeting on Thursday, May 5 to recognize scholarship recipients, announce new principals, and approve recommendations listed by the superintendent and other board members. Kelley-Ann Parson, a representative from Curriculum Associates, which sponsored the Regional Superintendent of […]]]>

By Vallean Jackson, For La Tribune

JEFFERSON COUNTY — The Jefferson County School Board held a mandatory public board meeting on Thursday, May 5 to recognize scholarship recipients, announce new principals, and approve recommendations listed by the superintendent and other board members.

Kelley-Ann Parson, a representative from Curriculum Associates, which sponsored the Regional Superintendent of the Year Scholarships, presented the SSA Superintendent of the Year Scholarships. The program aims to pay it to those who are on the path of education. Anthonique Booker of Irondale Middle School won the administrative scholarship totaling $1,000 and Jaden Prewett of Corner High School won the student scholarship totaling $1,000 for their academic journeys at Montevallo University as well as their pursuit as future educators .

“As a graduate of Montevallo, I really wanted to congratulate you,” President Carita Venable said.

Superintendent Dr. Walter Gonsoulin expressed his joy as he revealed that almost a hundred students participated in Teacher Appreciation Week to recognize the hard work and dedication of their teachers. Continuing on from the good things that have happened, career technology students for the district, which is a combination of all high schools. Set a record with 89 students qualifying for the national competition. They will compete across the country in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas or Sacramento, and 11 of the 13 schools have student-athletes competing in track and field.

The board announced four new principals who are expected to serve for the next school year. The mix of men and women to replace those retiring includes:

  • Aisha Bryant will replace Donna King at Brighton School from June 1;
  • Dr. Loni Hodge will be the principal of Grantswood Community School, replacing Bryant as of June 1;
  • Michael Bissell will be principal of Chalkville Elementary, replacing Rod Johnson, beginning July 1; and
  • Brandi Wilson will be the principal of Kermit Johnson Elementary replacing Dr. Hodge, beginning July 1.

In addition, JEFCOED has approved the following:

  • Tender for lawn care in Brighton;
  • The cafeteria uniform supply;
  • The price of parent-teacher communication kits;
  • Concord’s lawn care offering; and
  • The Oak Grove Elementary Lawn Care Offering.

“Out of approximately 35,000 students, we want the best for all of our students,” Gonsoulin said. “Sometimes there may be a target on our backs, but the goal of keeping students and their education is always front and center.”

The next special meeting of the board of directors will take place on Tuesday, May 10 and the next regular meeting of the board of directors will take place on Thursday, May 26 at 10 a.m.


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Adtalem Global Education Foundation joins fight against cancer with grant to fund educational experiences for underrepresented students https://chicago43rd.org/adtalem-global-education-foundation-joins-fight-against-cancer-with-grant-to-fund-educational-experiences-for-underrepresented-students/ Wed, 04 May 2022 19:18:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/adtalem-global-education-foundation-joins-fight-against-cancer-with-grant-to-fund-educational-experiences-for-underrepresented-students/ CHICAGO, May 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Cancer Society has received a $100,000 grant from a new partner, the Adtalem Global Education Foundation. This inaugural partnership will focus on supporting two programs that will provide educational experiences in cancer research labs to underrepresented students, bringing diverse and unique perspectives to cancer research. “We cannot […]]]>

CHICAGO, May 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Cancer Society has received a $100,000 grant from a new partner, the Adtalem Global Education Foundation. This inaugural partnership will focus on supporting two programs that will provide educational experiences in cancer research labs to underrepresented students, bringing diverse and unique perspectives to cancer research.

“We cannot address the toughest challenges facing oncology, including the unequal burden of cancer in traditionally excluded populations, without building a more diverse workforce in cancer research and care. “says Dr. Kathleen Goss, vice president of the American Cancer Society. “We are thrilled to partner with the Adtalem Global Education Foundation to invest in our brightest young minds from underrepresented backgrounds in science – exposing them to careers in STEM and oncology and helping them position yourself for long-term success.”

Implementation of this grant will serve researchers and the Summer Care Experience (SHE) in Oncology, as well as the Diversity in Cancer Research (DICR) internship program. The American Cancer Society supports women-led cancer research through the ResearchERS initiative, a dedicated funding stream that directly supports the work of women in cancer research and related STEM fields. SHE in Oncology is an intensive 2-week program that introduces female-identifying high school juniors or seniors, particularly those from underrepresented backgrounds in STEM, to a wide range of related career experiences. to cancer, including research, clinical care, survivorship and community engagement. The DICR Internship Program funds biomedical research internships offered to undergraduate students whose racial or ethnic background is underrepresented in the field.

“Adtalem is focused on creating educational pathways for underrepresented students and improving health equity,” says Steve Beard, President and CEO of Adtalem Global Education. “This grant directly supports ResearchERS, the Oncology Healthcare Summer Experience, and the Diversity in Cancer Research Internship Program, initiatives that align with our social mission of increasing diversity, equity and inclusion both in health education and among the health workforce.

Through this alignment, the funding will support groups that have traditionally been excluded from cancer research and care, increase access to desirable internships for underserved students, and ultimately address disparities in Health care. With this generous grant, the American Cancer Society can continue its longstanding goal of addressing and reducing barriers to cancer care for those who need it most.

About the Adtalem Global Education Foundation
Founded in 2010, the Adtalem Global Education Foundation is organized to support charitable, educational and research purposes. The only member of the Foundation is Adtalem Global Education. The Foundation’s activities reflect commitment to the following strategic areas: investing to expand access to education, jobs and careers; support the development of the communities where we live and work; and combating inequalities and encouraging civic engagement. Visit the Adtalem Global Education Foundation for more information or to apply for funding.

About Adtalem Global Education
Adtalem Global Education (NYSE: ATGE) is a leading healthcare educator and professional talent provider for the healthcare industry. With a focus on delivering strong outcomes that increase workforce readiness, Adtalem empowers a diverse population of learners to achieve their goals and make inspiring contributions to their communities. Adtalem is the parent organization of American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine, Chamberlain University, Ross University School of Medicine, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and Walde University. Adtalem and its institutions have over 10,000 employees and a network of over 275,000 alumni. Adtalem was named one of America’s Most Responsible Companies 2021 by Newsweek and one of America’s Best Diversity Employers 2022 by Forbes. Follow Adtalem on Twitter @adtalemglobal, LinkedIn or visit Adtalem.com for more information.

About the American Cancer Society
The American Cancer Society is a global force of 1.5 million volunteers dedicated to saving lives, celebrating lives, and leading the fight for a world without cancer. From groundbreaking research to free accommodation near treatment, a 24/7/365 live helpline, free rides to treatment, and convening powerful activists to create awareness and impact, the Society attacks cancer from all angles. For more information, visit www.cancer.org.

American Cancer Society Media Contact:
Angela Stacy
[email protected]

Adtalem media contact:
Kelly Finelli
[email protected]

SOURCE American Cancer Society at Illinois

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Lightfoot leaves Board of Education seat empty after arguing against elected council https://chicago43rd.org/lightfoot-leaves-board-of-education-seat-empty-after-arguing-against-elected-council/ Sun, 01 May 2022 16:54:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/lightfoot-leaves-board-of-education-seat-empty-after-arguing-against-elected-council/ Nine months have passed since one of seven members of the Chicago Board of Education resigned her seat, and there has been little to no public indication that Mayor Lori Lightfoot has decided to appoint a replacement. . Amy Rome, former teacher and director of the National Teachers Academy, attended her last board meeting in […]]]>

Nine months have passed since one of seven members of the Chicago Board of Education resigned her seat, and there has been little to no public indication that Mayor Lori Lightfoot has decided to appoint a replacement. .

Amy Rome, former teacher and director of the National Teachers Academy, attended her last board meeting in July 2021.

But after unsuccessfully lobbying against a bill last year that will create an elected school board for Chicago in two years, the mayor has failed to take advantage of his opportunity to have a say in who will sit on the board. education.

When Lightfoot fought the elected school board, she argued that it was imperative for her to appoint the entire board since the mayor is widely seen as responsible for the success — or failure — of the school system.

Lightfoot has less than a year until the spring 2023 mayoral election, followed by the first school board elections in late 2024 and the takeover of the new board in early 2025. If Lightfoot is re-elected, she will be able to appoint 11 members. of the new 21-seat council to serve the first two years of his term. When the council is fully elected two years later, the mayor will have no say in its composition.

During her three years in office, Lightfoot has been known to move slowly to fill vacancies, often leaving positions open in her administration for months. More recently, she waited eight months after ousting Inspector General Joe Ferguson before replacing him this month with Deborah Witzburg.

Asked if a selection process for Rome’s replacement has begun, city hall spokesman César Rodriguez said: “We have nothing to share at the moment. At the moment nothing has changed.”

CPS spokeswoman Mary Fergus said the district is “confident that the vacancy on the Chicago Board of Education will be filled, but in the meantime, the vacancy has not impacted the ability of our administration to work with the board or on the work of the board to meet the needs of the district and its students.”

If the vacancy drags on into the summer, however, the board will be in a difficult position. Two more members are expected to leave in the coming months when their terms expire, leaving just four committed members on the board ahead of what district officials are calling a crucial pandemic “recovery” school year beginning in autumn.

State Rep. Kam Buckner, D-Chicago, who supported the elected school board bill, said “the fact that you’re going through nine months with a vacancy in one of the most important roles in the city ​​government is problematic”.

“It should be a priority for any administration to at least make sure those roles are fulfilled so the board can do its job properly,” he said. “I wonder who they ask. I talk to people all over town every day. … I know people who would clamor, jump at the chance to serve in one of these roles.

“I find it hard to understand why it would be so difficult to fill a role like this with someone who is committed to representing young people.

Buckner said he would like to see a public and transparent nomination process similar to that of the 11th Ward City Council headquarters that allowed candidates to submit their names before the mayor ultimately chooses Nicole Lee, the first Chinese-American councilwoman. from Chicago.

“A lot of times when you’re making these decisions in a back room, there are only a few people in the pool, politically connected people who are engaged in politics,” he said. “And the truth is that the best candidates may not be those of us who are in the political sphere or field.

“I think it would be good practice to let it be known publicly that we have an open school board position and see what interest comes from all over town, and I bet you that would be plenty.”

Aldus. Michael Scott (24th), chairman of the council’s education and child development committee, said he had spoken to Lightfoot about the vacancy and knew his office was looking for a replacement.

“The mayor, the administration know the urgency of filling this vacancy and those to come,” Scott said. “You need to find someone who understands that they could be moving very soon because of the elected school board. But also someone who wants to take up the challenge. The CPS is really a big monster. … It’s hard work, and you need to find the right person who can do the job and is willing to do it.

Contributor: Francois Spielman

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College savings program will give kids $50 in 2023 https://chicago43rd.org/college-savings-program-will-give-kids-50-in-2023/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 01:55:22 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/college-savings-program-will-give-kids-50-in-2023/ Every child born or adopted in Illinois after Dec. 31 will receive a college savings account operated by the Office of the State Treasurer with a $50 starting deposit through the Education Savings Program superior. Three years after the Illinois General Assembly First passed the program in 2019, lawmakers allocated $2.5 million to fund it. […]]]>

Every child born or adopted in Illinois after Dec. 31 will receive a college savings account operated by the Office of the State Treasurer with a $50 starting deposit through the Education Savings Program superior.

Three years after the Illinois General Assembly First passed the program in 2019, lawmakers allocated $2.5 million to fund it. The fundraising program, supported by parent activists across the state, was sponsored in part by Rep. Robyn Gabel (D-Evanston).

“I truly believe that education is the key to success and that a person’s income is directly related to their education,” Rep. Gabel said. “My goal is to create a healthier community, and one of the best ways to do that is to educate everyone to the highest level possible.”

To access the funds, parents or guardians of eligible children must first claim the $50 seed funding for a child before their 10th birthday. To use the funds, the beneficiary must either be 18 years old or complete high school. If funds are not used by the recipient’s 26th birthday, they will be forfeited to the state.

Amy Eisenstein (Weinberg ’17), a member of the Heartland Alliance’s research and policy team and leader of its coalition, said parents have always been at the forefront of this movement.

The Chicago human rights nonprofit has been advocating for statewide children’s savings accounts for more than a decade, with financial inclusion for all the Illinois coalition, which includes parents, service providers and community organizations, according to Eisenstein.

“The most instrumental members of our coalition are the parent leaders who have been fighting for this for nearly a decade,” Eisenstein said. “They see this investment as truly a seed of hope for the future and their children in their community.”

Some Illinois House Republicans criticized the program because they did not view a $50 college savings initiative as a worthwhile investment. As tuition continues to rise, they said the $50 would not cover enough impact for every family.

Other state lawmakers and activists, on the other hand, argued that the program’s purpose was to kick-start savings and encourage parents to begin preparing for their child’s college education from birth. This can be especially crucial for low-income families impacted by generational wealth inequality or families where a college education is not common and who would otherwise be unable to create their own savings fund, Eisenstein said.

“In Illinois, the racial wealth gap is deep and pervasive, and there are communities that are often excluded from the mechanisms of wealth creation,” Eisenstein said. “Children’s savings accounts are a policy that we know can be powerful in promoting wealth-creating communities that might not otherwise see saving for higher education as a possibility.”

Despite questions about its effectiveness, Gabel said research done for the college savings program found that it doesn’t matter how much money is in a savings account — the existence of the account makes a difference.

According to the Heartland Alliance’s 2017 report on children’s savings accounts, children with a college savings account are twice as likely to seriously plan to go to college.

The report also found that Bright Start 529 College Savings Accounts, an existing state-sponsored account that offers tax advantages, are disproportionately created by white, educated, male, high-income people.

Rosazlia Grillier, co-chair emeritus of the Community Organizing and Family Issues family advocacy and resource center and a mother herself, said that during her organization’s advocacy work for children’s savings funds, the group realized that there were many barriers to opening college savings accounts.

“The 529 has always been around, but it wasn’t accessible to communities of color or people living in financially challenged communities, and we didn’t know how to navigate it or even what it was,” said Grillier said. “So we started trying to make it accessible to people.”

Legislation supporting this program includes a section that will allow the Office of the Treasurer to track who benefits from the program to see what barriers to fairness may still be in place, according to Grillier.

After years of advocacy work, Grillier said it was bittersweet to see the legislation pass because of the approximately $8 million originally requested, the group received $2.5 million. But, she says, it’s an important step to take to ensure that saving for college is accessible to everyone.

“It’s really a statement that empowers our kids,” Grillier said, “$50 isn’t going to pay for a college education, but it can tell you, ‘I believe in you, let me get you started.’ “”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @shannonmtyler

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From Loan Cancellation to Pell Grant Expansion: The Democratic Candidates’ Ideas for Higher Education

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Former Chicago Blackhawks players team up with Inner City Education for charity hockey event https://chicago43rd.org/former-chicago-blackhawks-players-team-up-with-inner-city-education-for-charity-hockey-event/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 04:47:02 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/former-chicago-blackhawks-players-team-up-with-inner-city-education-for-charity-hockey-event/ CHICAGO (WLS) – The hockey season is winding down and there will be no NHL playoffs in Chicago this year, but the game continues to grow. On Sunday night, a charity game involving former members of the Blackhawks took place on the ice at Fifth Third Arena and ABC7’s Ravi Baichwal had the chance to […]]]>
CHICAGO (WLS) – The hockey season is winding down and there will be no NHL playoffs in Chicago this year, but the game continues to grow.

On Sunday night, a charity game involving former members of the Blackhawks took place on the ice at Fifth Third Arena and ABC7’s Ravi Baichwal had the chance to skate with the people supporting Inner City Education, also known as program name “ICE”.

The pucks were flying like only NHL players can, and then there were the others trying to keep up – all for a good cause.

“We raise funds to provide hockey and educational opportunities to low-income children for whom these opportunities may not be available,” said Brad Erickson, Inner City Education Program Director.

Erickson now has 150 kids in its program who are introduced to hockey at the earliest possible age and using its structure to teach teamwork, discipline and goal setting.

Darius Mack and Jeff Adams graduated from the program. They started skating when they were 9 years old in Garfield Park, but said they probably wouldn’t have approached their neighborhood rink if ICE hadn’t brought it to them.

“Where we’re from, you know, not too far from here Garfield Park, there weren’t a lot of opportunities to do things that opened doors for us,” Darius Mack said. “Introduced us to a new game and had the opportunity of something we’ve experienced before and are grateful for that.”

This is the first fundraiser for ICE in three years due to the pandemic.

“I feel good, I haven’t been on the ice in probably five years, so it’s exciting to be able to come back here,” said Jeff Adams.

“It’s an expensive sport. It’s not available in low-income communities, so we provide equipment, coaching, ice time, mentorship and academic tutoring,” Erickson added.

The goal is to expand the program with the help of the Chicago Blackhawks and the wider hockey community, represented by the “Beer League Legends” in this game.

“Well keep showing up, we show up and show our face, and it’s kids wanting to be and see what it’s all about, and then they see they’re interested and we just want to keep it going. “Adams said when asked how he maintains momentum in non-traditional hockey communities.

The jerseys from the night’s contest, which the white team won 10-8, are up for auction on ICE’s website.

Copyright © 2022 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

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Buford School Board Recognizes Students for Career and Technical Education Achievements https://chicago43rd.org/buford-school-board-recognizes-students-for-career-and-technical-education-achievements/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 13:49:53 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/buford-school-board-recognizes-students-for-career-and-technical-education-achievements/ At its meeting on Monday, April 18, the Buford Board of Education recognized students who placed in the top five in the state for their career and technical student organization events, some of whom will compete in competitions. national. “I don’t know of any other school system that so generously supports our students who compete […]]]>

At its meeting on Monday, April 18, the Buford Board of Education recognized students who placed in the top five in the state for their career and technical student organization events, some of whom will compete in competitions. national.

“I don’t know of any other school system that so generously supports our students who compete in national competitions,” said Jennifer Woods, director of career and technical education for Buford City Schools.

Between Buford Middle and Buford High School, 19 students were recognized for their placement in their events, and a number of them will go on to compete against thousands of other students in national competitions as far away as Nashville, Chicago and even San Diego this summer. .

Later in the meeting, Buford Middle School principal Keith Johnson rose to deliver his monthly report to the board, but instead handed the responsibility to sixth form students Maria Carolina Panosso and Jean Claude Luemba.

Panosso and Luemba are both students in Mrs. Anna Misley’s English as a Second Language course in college, and after perfectly delivering the principal’s report, the room erupted in applause in recognition of the students’ efforts and courage.

Panosso is from Brazil, and although she had some knowledge of English before moving to Buford for her sixth year, she was much more comfortable speaking her native Portuguese.

Luemba moved to Buford in his third year from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and he joked that when he arrived the only English he knew was “I don’t know English”.

“It takes so much courage to do what they did, and I’m so proud that they were able to do it,” Misley said after the meeting. “We practiced getting up and introducing ourselves to the director. I think that’s when Mr. Johnson came up with this idea.

The board also approved the purchase and surplus of a variety of technology and equipment needed to maintain the functionality of the school system, including a new copier for the superintendent’s office and resurfacing of all floors in the gymnasium. .

Board members also approved a number of field trip requests, many of which were for CTSO’s national competitions this summer, as well as the BHS group traveling to London to take part in the New Year’s Day Parade at the end of 2023.

Superintendent Melanie Reed then presented her report, which included announcing an optional four-day work week for 12-month employees in June and July, as well as introducing the Orton Gillingham Instructional Phonics program into the curriculum. to help improve literacy.

The next meeting of the Buford School Board will be at 7 p.m., Monday, May 16, at the central office, 2625 Sawnee Avenue in Buford.

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U-46 School District Launches Program to Help Education Support Staff Become Teachers, School Nurses, and More https://chicago43rd.org/u-46-school-district-launches-program-to-help-education-support-staff-become-teachers-school-nurses-and-more/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 22:11:24 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/u-46-school-district-launches-program-to-help-education-support-staff-become-teachers-school-nurses-and-more/ BARTLETT, Ill. (WLS) – District U-46, the second-largest school district in Illinois, has launched a new program that reimburses district employees for tuition to become teachers or perform work that the district has greatly needed. Laura Taets drove a bus for U-46 for 14 years and said now that her children are older she is […]]]>
BARTLETT, Ill. (WLS) – District U-46, the second-largest school district in Illinois, has launched a new program that reimburses district employees for tuition to become teachers or perform work that the district has greatly needed.

Laura Taets drove a bus for U-46 for 14 years and said now that her children are older she is a reader for another challenge. The 43-year-old wants to be a teacher.

“I can do more. More for the community, more for the U-46,” Taets said.

When she mentioned the idea to Superintendent Tony Sanders, he said he would consider it. He was looking for an incentive to attract and retain employees in a competitive market.

This week, he presented the reimbursement program, for employees from bus drivers to secretaries. District teachers have their own incentives for continuing education. In fact, tuition reimbursement helped the superintendent get his doctorate in March.

“I wouldn’t be superintendent of this district if it wasn’t for the tuition reimbursement that the board put in place for me,” Sanders said.

But it’s a relatively new concept for other education support workers.

Registered nurse Lizz LaRue has her bachelor’s degree, but needs 10 course credit hours to get her school nurse certification. She was one of the first to apply for the reimbursement program.

“It allows us who don’t teach to have opportunities to grow and give back,” she said.

LaRue estimated that tuition for the courses she needs would cost around $8,000. The district council has allocated $1.4 million for the program’s first year. Sanders said the district needs employees in a number of positions, and filling them with staff already working in the district benefits everyone.

“This is for bus drivers, para-educators, support staff who otherwise wouldn’t have the opportunity to return to school,” he said.

Employees can apply for the program starting Thursday. If accepted, classes begin in the fall.

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UIC’s Center for Urban Education Leadership Received Grant to Continue Developing CPS Leaders https://chicago43rd.org/uics-center-for-urban-education-leadership-received-grant-to-continue-developing-cps-leaders/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 14:00:02 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/uics-center-for-urban-education-leadership-received-grant-to-continue-developing-cps-leaders/ Shelby Cosner, center, works with members of the Center for Urban Educational Leadership. The center recently received a grant to work with Chicago Public Schools to develop network leaders. The UIC Center for Urban Education Leadership received a $250,000 grant to continue its efforts to help Chicago Public Schools’ five-year vision strengthen its leadership pipeline. […]]]>
Shelby Cosner, center, works with members of the Center for Urban Educational Leadership. The center recently received a grant to work with Chicago Public Schools to develop network leaders.

The UIC Center for Urban Education Leadership received a $250,000 grant to continue its efforts to help Chicago Public Schools’ five-year vision strengthen its leadership pipeline.

The Lloyd A. Fry Foundation’s two-year grant continues the center’s work that began with a $250,000 grant in 2020 to develop network leaders as senior supervisors who perform continuous improvement and support managers in district to develop as instructional leaders.

The school district is the third largest in the nation, behind Los Angeles and New York, with 638 schools and more than 340,000 students. As part of its leadership structure, CPS is organized into networks that provide administrative support, strategic direction, and leadership development to schools in each network.

The grants are designed to continue the development of network leaders to improve school leadership, said Shelby Cosner, director of UIC’s Center for Leadership in Urban Education and the project’s principal investigator.

“At CPS, network leaders are really positioned to amplify school leadership, so when you look at schools and when you think about the theory of what happens in a school that impacts student learning, leadership is among the most important things,” said Cosner, who is a professor of educational policy studies at the UIC College of Education.

During work under the first grant, UIC officials worked with network leaders to become more oriented as “leader developers” by focusing their attention on developing leaders and leadership in each of the schools so that the principal’s or school’s leadership structure can impact the organizations and instruction.

Cosner dubbed the CPS a “sub-district structure” because it is so large. As a result, to make the size of the neighborhood manageable, network leaders hold a lot of power and influence over school education in neighborhood network buildings. There are 21 networks, grouped by region and school type, all under the CPS Network Support Office.

The first year of the grant was spent collecting data so that the center could get a sense of the impact of the networks on schools. This was done by interviewing chiefs and their deputies, principals and other leaders, as well as reviewing documentation.

Shelby Cosner, center, works with members of the Center for Urba
Shelby Cosner, center, works with members of the Center for Urban Educational Leadership.

After the center analyzed all of its data after the first year, UIC officials met with the Network Support Office and worked together to highlight the issues. One of the issues was how to tackle the “high churn schools” that have historically struggled. As they are in underfunded neighborhoods and serve more students of color, deep-seated factors have come to light.

“When you dig deeper, you find that these schools have dramatically different levels of chronic absenteeism, student homelessness, student mobility, and teacher turnover,” Cosner said. “These four characteristics were not understood to be underlying factors in schools, and they are.”

One of the goals of the new grant is to continue to embrace learning design and collect ongoing data to analyze what teaching, organization, and leadership look like in schools across the district, putting particular emphasis on the difference in “high churn” schools. The objective is to develop strategies between the network and the center to help these schools.

“One of the things we’re looking at right now is living in this high churn space,” Cosner said. “It will be really important that we understand how teaching, organization and leadership… are different in schools with high churn. What are teachers doing differently?”

The purpose of the grant is to come to an understanding of what those issues are, Cosner said. At the same time, there are likely to be many policies and practices at the district level, as well as policies and practices in the wider community, that worsen these conditions, she said. The goal is to design interventions and strategies to address these conditions.

The Lloyd A. Fry Foundation supports organizations with the strength and commitment needed to solve the city of Chicago’s persistent problems resulting from poverty, violence, ignorance and despair. They seek to build the capacity of the individuals and systems that serve them. Their vision is that Chicago provides education, prosperity and hope for all.

In 1933, Lloyd A. Fry founded the Lloyd A. Fry Roofing Company in southwest Chicago. Over the next five decades, the company grew to become the world’s largest manufacturer of asphalt roofing and related products, with nearly 5,000 dedicated employees in manufacturing facilities nationwide. The company was sold to Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation in 1977. Much of the proceeds from the sale of the company now serve as an endowment for the Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, which has served the needs of the Chicago community since 1983. .

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