public schools – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 02:38:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chicago43rd.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png public schools – Chicago 43rd http://chicago43rd.org/ 32 32 Old Sec. Arne Duncan says he won’t challenge Lightfoot in Chicago mayoral race – NBC Chicago https://chicago43rd.org/old-sec-arne-duncan-says-he-wont-challenge-lightfoot-in-chicago-mayoral-race-nbc-chicago/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 01:17:41 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/old-sec-arne-duncan-says-he-wont-challenge-lightfoot-in-chicago-mayoral-race-nbc-chicago/ Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan, the most prominent potential candidate to try to unseat Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, will not enter the race, announcing on Tuesday that he will focus on work instead with his non-profit organization. “After careful consideration, I have decided that I will not be running for mayor, but will work with […]]]>

Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan, the most prominent potential candidate to try to unseat Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, will not enter the race, announcing on Tuesday that he will focus on work instead with his non-profit organization.

“After careful consideration, I have decided that I will not be running for mayor, but will work with anyone serious about making our city safer,” he said in a statement.

Duncan, who also served as CEO of Chicago Public Schools, was ahead of Lightfoot in a head-to-head contest according to an internal poll, but said he would focus on working with the Create Real Economic group instead. Diversity (CRED) in their efforts to combat violence in the city.

“I am exactly where I need to be, doing the job I love. I have never been part of such a brave and committed team,” he said. “The best way to serve our city ​​is to stay focused on reducing gun violence and to stay engaged at our sites, on the streets and in the lives of our participants.”

Duncan says Chicago mayor is a tough position, especially in a time when the crime rate is under a demanding microscope.

“It’s absolutely hard work, and it’s extremely important work. I could have liked this job. I love what I’m doing right now,” he said.

Even with Duncan leaving the race, there are still plenty of other potential candidates who could face Lightfoot. That list includes state Reps. LaShawn Ford and Kam Buckner, former CPS CEO Paul Vallas, current Chicago Teachers Union president Jesse Sharkey, and Fraternal Order of Police chief John Catanzara.

“To say that I’m not interested in being mayor of the city of Chicago would be disingenuous,” Ford said. “I understand that I have a lot of lived experiences to connect with people not just on the West Side and the South Side, but all over the city.”

As for Lightfoot herself, she says she intends to seek a second term, and with Duncan now out of the running, the rules of the game are changing fast.

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Caregiver Education Series Begins Thursday | Health and fitness https://chicago43rd.org/caregiver-education-series-begins-thursday-health-and-fitness/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/caregiver-education-series-begins-thursday-health-and-fitness/ “Overcoming Ambiguous Loss,” the first in a series of four virtual workshops sponsored by the Nebraska Caregiver Coalition, will take place via Zoom on Thursday, February 24, from noon to 1 p.m. The workshops are designed to provide training, education, support and resources for family caregivers. Presenter, Dr. Kelly Tamayo, will talk about common symptoms/signs […]]]>

“Overcoming Ambiguous Loss,” the first in a series of four virtual workshops sponsored by the Nebraska Caregiver Coalition, will take place via Zoom on Thursday, February 24, from noon to 1 p.m. The workshops are designed to provide training, education, support and resources for family caregivers.

Presenter, Dr. Kelly Tamayo, will talk about common symptoms/signs after loss, limbo grief – how to deal with it effectively, assign meaning and value to the loss, and how to move forward with courage, strength and determination.

Tamayo is a clinical/health psychologist specializing in trauma, PTSD and brain injury recovery. Her clinical experience includes work at UNMC, Madonna Rehabilitation Center, Dr. Phil/PsychoNeuroPlasticity Center in Dallas, and Chicago Public Schools.

Her expertise in neurogenesis and resilience provides clients with support and guidance to overcome grief and trauma. Tamayo is about to complete a graduate degree in psychopharmacology. To register for this event, visit www.answers4families.org/overcoming-ambiguous-loss.

The Nebraska Caregiver Coalition focuses on the needs and interests of caregivers from all walks of life. Its goal is to develop and implement a statewide caregiver outreach program for state senators, plan and implement a statewide grassroots engagement. State and identify resources and partnerships to expand and coordinate the activities of the Nebraska Caregiver Coalition.

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TCM’s Jacqueline Stewart Highlights Black Film History | Entertainment https://chicago43rd.org/tcms-jacqueline-stewart-highlights-black-film-history-entertainment/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:54:18 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/tcms-jacqueline-stewart-highlights-black-film-history-entertainment/ LOS ANGELES (AP) — Film pundit Jacqueline Stewart makes a rich contribution to TCM for Black History Month, leading discussions on “Selma” with its star, David Oyelowo, and highlighting the work of Oscar Micheaux and other pioneer filmmakers. The result is both festive and stimulating. “Our programming spans from the 1920s to 2014, nearly a […]]]>

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Film pundit Jacqueline Stewart makes a rich contribution to TCM for Black History Month, leading discussions on “Selma” with its star, David Oyelowo, and highlighting the work of Oscar Micheaux and other pioneer filmmakers.

The result is both festive and stimulating.

“Our programming spans from the 1920s to 2014, nearly a century of African American cinema,” Stewart said. “We see the same kind of themes, a call for racial justice. People will have a much deeper idea of ​​the complexity of these issues and why we need to raise these issues in our country. »

February’s list honoring African-American films and creators is just one aspect of how Stewart, TCM’s first and only co-host of color since 2019 and a professor at the University of Chicago, has improved the chain game.

Focusing on black cinema history once a year “cannot be the full experience for TCM,” said Pola Changnon, its chief executive.

“Having Jacqueline at the table, she’s a voice in driving programming selections,” Changnon said. “She’s really great at pointing us to things that we might not have thought of before, not only movies, but also other experts who can really bring those movies to life.

Stewart, whose academic focus is on silent films and film noir, was a guest at TCM before being asked to host the new “Silent Sunday Nights” showcase for domestic and international films and shorts.

In 2021, the newly opened Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles named her Artistic Director and Director of Programming, with a portfolio including screenings, exhibitions and educational activities. (Stewart is on sabbatical from the Film and Media Studies department at the University of Chicago, where she earned a Ph.D. in English).

The past year has been a banner: Stewart received a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, an honor dubbed the Genius Grant, for ensuring that overlooked black filmmakers and audiences have “a place in the public imagination,” as stated by the foundation.

She sees her work as part of a larger and urgent American reassessment: “We all need to think more deeply about issues of racial equality and social justice,” as recent years have shown.

“We’ve had very deep conversations at TCM about what it means to show classic films at this historic moment, and how we can reflect on the legacy of misrepresentation in these films and the erasure of people of color,” she said, and about “sexism and homophobia, transphobia, that you find in classic movies.”

Last year, for TCM’s “Reframed: Classic Films in the Rearview Mirror” project, Stewart and his four co-hosts examined blatant racial stereotyping and other demeaning elements in films including “The Jazz Singer.” from 1927, “Gone with the Wind” from 1939, and “The Children’s Hour” from 1961, which portrayed same-sex relationships as shameful.

Stewart’s appearances as a guest expert on TCM eventually landed her on the co-host roster along with Ben Mankiewicz, Dave Karger, Alicia Malone and Eddie Muller.

“We were always so impressed with not only how much she knew coming in, but also how graceful and how present she was on camera and communicating with another host about what she knew,” Changnon said. “Not everyone can translate this kind of academic expertise” for viewers.

Stewart says she’s thrilled with the scope of TCM’s Black History Month programming, which continues Sunday through Feb. 27 and includes fellow college students Racquel Gates and Samantha Sheppard.

“Having two Oscar Micheaux movies, two Philadelphia Colored Players movies — they’re some of the most moving and accomplished early racing movies,” Stewart said, applying the term generally used to refer to the movies. made by and for African Americans in the first half of the 20th century.

“I hope people take the opportunity to see them and to see the conversations we have about them,” she said.

“Oscar Micheaux: The Superhero of Black Cinema,” airing Sunday at 9:30 p.m. EST, examines the work of the director and producer who has made more than 40 silent and sound films. Oyelowo is on board February 20 and 27, for performances such as “Selma,” “Malcolm X” and the 1968 documentary “Black Panthers.”

“I really enjoyed the depth with which he thinks about the importance of the roles he takes on. He talks about playing Dr. Martin Luther King in ‘Selma’…and the urgency of stories like that- there for our contemporary times,” she said.

Stewart’s research, teaching, and writing, including the 2015 book “LA Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema,” prepared her to expand her audience into the world of moviegoers – which she has been a part of ever since. childhood.

Growing up in her native Chicago, Stewart and an aunt regularly indulged in watching late-night movies on television.

“We would talk about movies during commercial breaks and his passion for classic movie stars,” Stewart recalled. “His fandom really rubbed off on me.”

His attention was drawn to black actors who were largely relegated to minor roles in most Hollywood studio productions.

“They may not be credited and they play servants, but they are there. Our eyes go to these actors, and I’ve always been intrigued by people like Hattie McDaniel and Willie Best and Theresa Harris,” she said. “I’ve always thought that even if black people weren’t not central to the narrative of classic mainstream movies, the presence was there.

“I became curious about this presence and wanted to know more about what these people were. And I wanted to think about the racial politics of portraying black people in this way on screen,” Stewart said.

Silent films also fascinated her, becoming a mainstay of her studies.

“I love the silent actor styles because you don’t rely on the dialogue to tell the story. Instead, the actors really do things in terms of expressions, in terms of how the actors interact with each other,” she said. Silent films are a “much more sophisticated form of artistic expression…and they laid the groundwork for everything that came after.”

Stewart eventually paired his early love of filmmaking with the direction gained by his extended “teacher family” in Chicago’s public schools.

“It’s a family that really believes in education and has a lot of expectations about how best to use the gifts you have and the privileges you have,” she said.

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In the wake of Omicron – Education Next https://chicago43rd.org/in-the-wake-of-omicron-education-next/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 10:00:36 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/in-the-wake-of-omicron-education-next/ Like this number Education Next in press, the national spike in Covid-19 cases caused primarily by the Omicron variant has begun to subside. In Massachusetts and other northeastern states, where Omicron first entered the United States, the total number of cases and cases among students and school staff fell precipitously. Yes, hospitalization rates remain high, […]]]>

Like this number Education Next in press, the national spike in Covid-19 cases caused primarily by the Omicron variant has begun to subside. In Massachusetts and other northeastern states, where Omicron first entered the United States, the total number of cases and cases among students and school staff fell precipitously. Yes, hospitalization rates remain high, and in many places hospitals are dangerously close to capacity. This pandemic has too often defied expectations to allow confident assertions about its future. It seems possible, however, that we are entering a new stage in the way school systems are responding to the pandemic – a stage which, with the 2022 midterm elections looming, will lead to a gradual easing of restrictions, even in the most vigilant countries. states.

Although we may have reached a turning point in the impact of the pandemic on education, the latest peak in the disease has already caused a new wave of disruption. As Omicron grew, the Chicago Teachers Union once again demonstrated who runs public schools in the nation’s third-largest city by forcing a four-day closure over objections from the city’s mayor and school principal. city. Nationally, tracking service Burbio reported that in the first three weeks of January, more than 5,700 K-12 schools closed or went virtual each week, on average. But those closures differed from those that kept many schools totally remote throughout the 2020-2021 school year. The 2022 closures were driven primarily by staff shortages rather than false hopes of containing the spread of the virus. A growing number of jurisdictions are now reducing or halting contact tracing in schools, noting the low number of positive cases identified by these efforts and the burden they place on school personnel.

Unlike many other viral illnesses, Covid-19 spares most children the worst physical harm. Yet our collective inability to adapt to this reality has forced children to suffer serious damage to their learning. The growing body of data on students’ academic progress makes this clear. Spring 2021 state test results revealed a massive setback in student literacy and numeracy development. High school graduation rates, after rising steadily for more than a decade, have fallen sharply in 2021 despite an easing of credential requirements. The non-academic development of students has also suffered. The American Academy of Pediatrics has gone so far as to declare a national emergency in the area of ​​children’s mental health.

As school systems struggled to respond to the pandemic over the past two years, some families have taken matters into their own hands. In this issue, Daniel Hamlin and Education Next editor Paul E. Peterson provides an update on recent developments in the world of homeschooling (see “Homeschooling Has Soared During the Pandemic, But What Does the Future Hold?” characteristics, this problem). Hamlin and Peterson note that “even conservative estimates point to a doubling of practice during the pandemic,” with up to 6% of U.S. children learning at home without simultaneously being enrolled in public or private school, as of June 2021. Ways for students to be homeschooled are also changing, the authors note, with more families piecing together a mix of online experiences, participation in informal co-ops, and perhaps a class or two at a formal school for complete their child’s education.

This growth in homeschooling has been accompanied – and in some cases aided – by an expansion of policies promoting parental choice. At least 18 states created or expanded private school choice programs amid the pandemic in 2021 (see “School Choice Advances in the States,” characteristics, Fall 2021). Republican leaders in other states are now looking to increase that number. Texas Governor Greg Abbott said that “this next session. . . you’re going to see a stronger, faster, and more powerful school choice movement than you’ve ever seen in the history of the state of Texas. Glenn Youngkin, the newly elected governor of Virginia, has proposed increasing the number of charter schools in the Commonwealth from less than 10 to around 200.

A pandemic that is claiming the lives of over five million people worldwide, robbing millions of others of the joy of social interaction and disrupting education for months on end has no silver lining. If, however, the response to Covid-19 leads policymakers to offer families more options to meet the needs of students, this change will be part of its legacy that we must all make the most of as we seek to repair the damage of the pandemic to the children of our country and to truly build back better.

Martin R. West

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WATCH NOW: Jared Smith appointed new Superintendent of Waterloo Schools | Education News https://chicago43rd.org/watch-now-jared-smith-appointed-new-superintendent-of-waterloo-schools-education-news/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 14:20:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/watch-now-jared-smith-appointed-new-superintendent-of-waterloo-schools-education-news/ Jared Smith appointed Superintendent of Waterloo Schools WATERLOO — Jared Smith, former vice-principal of East High, has been named the next superintendent of Waterloo Community Schools. His hiring will become official upon approval at the February 14 regular meeting of the Board of Education. Smith, 39, […]]]>


Jared Smith appointed Superintendent of Waterloo Schools







WATERLOO — Jared Smith, former vice-principal of East High, has been named the next superintendent of Waterloo Community Schools.

His hiring will become official upon approval at the February 14 regular meeting of the Board of Education.

Smith, 39, grew up in Waterloo and has served as superintendent since 2018 of South Tama County Community Schools, which has about 1,500 students. The district’s ethnic and racial diversity is similar to that of Waterloo Schools’ 10,100 students.






Black-smith


“I am thrilled to return home once again to lead your incredible school district,” he said in a video posted Monday by Waterloo Schools. “Whether you are an employee, student, parent or community member, know that I will take the time to listen and understand your perspective so that we can create an incredible learning experience for our children. “

“We are thrilled to welcome Dr. Smith to our district community as our next superintendent,” Board Chair Sue Flynn said in a press release. “Dr. Smith has proven himself to be an ambitious and passionate educational leader who is focused on engaging with families, recruiting exceptional teachers and staff, and fostering communities of care for students. He is also a thought leader in (of) education, and someone other school leaders turn to for advice and expertise.”

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Sue Flynn NEW

Flynn


According to the press release, at South Tama County Schools, Smith focused on creating positive work environments for employees, which resulted in an increase in staff culture and climate scores four. years in a row. He is also the author of a book, has written a number of articles and has given several presentations on various issues related to educational leadership.

Additionally, Smith has helped make South Tama one of the best districts in the state for community engagement through social media.

“We’re actually tracking our metrics,” he told The Courier in an interview last week. Compared to state school systems, “we’re consistently at or near the top of every major district” when it comes to the number of people viewing his social media posts. “We are relentless in sharing our story.

“Waterloo is doing a really good job of that,” he added. “It’s definitely something I would continue to monitor and take to another level if possible.”

“We look forward to seeing the positive impact he will have on Waterloo Community Schools in the future,” Flynn said in the press release. “We really feel like he will be a champion for our district.”

Smith was one of four finalists vying to lead the district. Others included Darren Hanna, Superintendent of Emmetsburg Community Schools; Stephanie Jones, Chicago Public Schools Director in the Office of Various Learner Services and Supports; and Amy Kortemeyer, assistant superintendent of educational services at Iowa City Community Schools.

Leading a similar, but smaller, school district prepared as a finalist for the role of Superintendent of Waterloo

Under Smith’s leadership, South Tama achieved Iowa’s second-best four-year graduation rate for districts with a minority population of 40 percent or more, according to the news release. The district has also been recognized by several state and national organizations for its innovative educational practices and has created eight new staff positions to focus on students’ socio-emotional needs in recent years.

In South Tama and Waterloo, white students are the largest enrolled group, but they do not constitute the majority, according to online data from the Iowa Department of Education.

South Tama, with 53.7% non-white students, had a graduation rate of 90.91% in 2020, 91.5% in 2019 and 95.12% in 2018. Waterloo graduated 85.77% of its seniors in 2020, 82.91% in 2019, and 84.24% in 2018 Students who are non-white make up 55.5% of district enrollment.

Smith graduated in 2000 from Waterloo West High School. He previously served as Principal of Muscatine High School after his time at East High School from 2012 to 2016.

He began his career in 2004 as a teacher in Sarasota, Florida, then taught in public schools in Chicago. Smith returned to Iowa in 2008, working as an administrator for Fort Dodge Community Schools.

He holds a doctorate in instructional leadership from Iowa State University, a master’s degree in instructional leadership from National Louis University, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa.

“Having lived in Waterloo for most of my life, I am very motivated to see our students succeed,” Smith said in the video. “I love when I see Waterloo students thriving in the classroom, on the pitch, on stage and in life.”

In his candidacy comments included in the press release, Smith wrote: “Like many Waterloo students, I didn’t have it easy growing up, and I find great motivation in leading a school system where the he main goal is to help students overcome unique challenges, and I’m also driven to make Waterloo Community Schools a wonderful place for employees.

“We have placed great importance on the culture and climate of South Tama County, and we are committed to ensuring that our employees enjoy coming to work,” he added. “The idea that I can bring that same energy and enthusiasm around workplace morale to Waterloo is a very exciting idea and a challenge that gets me up in the morning.”

The council worked with Grundmeyer Leader Services of Ankeny to lead the search for the next superintendent. The process included a community-wide survey, asking residents of the district for their opinions on the qualities and characteristics they would like to see in the new district leader. The search consultants also held focus group meetings to establish desired qualifications for the position.

The board conducted a first round of interviews on January 19. The final talks were on Thursday, when the board offered a contract offer to a candidate who was not named at the time.

The contract takes effect July 1, when current superintendent Jane Lindaman retires.

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School closures drop for the first time this year | Education News https://chicago43rd.org/school-closures-drop-for-the-first-time-this-year-education-news/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 22:43:59 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/school-closures-drop-for-the-first-time-this-year-education-news/ The number of public schools that experienced disruptions, such as temporary closures and returns to remote learning, fell to 4,473 last week, down 38% from the previous week, when more than 7,000 schools recorded disruption. The slowdown in school disruption marks the first week in which the number of temporary closures and pivots to virtual […]]]>

The number of public schools that experienced disruptions, such as temporary closures and returns to remote learning, fell to 4,473 last week, down 38% from the previous week, when more than 7,000 schools recorded disruption.

The slowdown in school disruption marks the first week in which the number of temporary closures and pivots to virtual learning has decreased since schools reopened after the winter holidays in early January.

Although the comparison is somewhat uneven due to the fact that schools were not in session Monday to observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the analysis by the Burbio school monitoring site concludes that “the trend seems clear that disruption is slowing down”.

At its peak, around 10% of schools experienced disruptions last week, which stemmed from infections and exposures – and subsequent isolations and quarantines – leaving schools understaffed and increasing absenteeism rates. students.

Cartoons about coronavirus

Since the start of the calendar year, the vast majority of schools have continued to operate in person, five days a week without major hitches – although individual lessons within schools have been halted, as has learning for individual students who must self-isolate or quarantine after a positive test or exposure.

As it stands, about 95% of all schools are open to in-person learning, which includes schools in the nation’s three largest school systems, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago — though the latter comes after a week of deadlock. earlier this month between city officials and union leaders who barred students from classrooms for five days.

The Biden administration continues to pressure schools to stay open at all costs and announced last week that it would make 10 million COVID-19 tests available to schools each month to help them do so. . Over the past month, the White House has also backed stay-testing policies that allow teachers and exposed children to stay in school, shortened periods of isolation and quarantine, and unlocked federal aid for schools to help prevent staff shortages.

The president even took the time during a press conference marking his first year in office to chastise the media for focusing on the closures and pointed out that the overwhelming majority of schools were open.

“It’s always going to be front page news,” Biden said of local school closures. “It will always be the top of the news.”

“Very few schools are closing,” he said.

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RE#11 faces historic teacher shortage crisis; The quality of education compromised https://chicago43rd.org/re11-faces-historic-teacher-shortage-crisis-the-quality-of-education-compromised/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:39:23 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/re11-faces-historic-teacher-shortage-crisis-the-quality-of-education-compromised/ Charleston, IL-(Radio Effingham)- Regional Office of Education #11 is calling on community collaborators to determine how to address a persistent and growing problem throughout the region and in Illinois as a whole: the shortage of qualified educators to teach children in its districts. school. “The problem is critical and has only gotten worse since the […]]]>

Charleston, IL-(Radio Effingham)- Regional Office of Education #11 is calling on community collaborators to determine how to address a persistent and growing problem throughout the region and in Illinois as a whole: the shortage of qualified educators to teach children in its districts. school.

“The problem is critical and has only gotten worse since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic,” says Dr. Kyle Thompson, Regional Superintendent of Schools. “The Association of Regional Superintendents of Illinois Schools (IARSS) conducts an annual statewide survey in each county,” it reports. “He asks detailed questions of local school district superintendents and the findings of our school districts are what we have known and feared for some time.”

Thompson reports the following results from local school districts that responded to the IARSS survey last fall:

  • 94% say we have a teacher shortage problem
  • 100% say we have a shortage of substitute teachers
  • 35% say COVID-19 has increased teacher turnover
  • 24% of advertised teaching positions have not been filled or have been filled by a less than qualified hire
  • 88% say logistical issues have led to an increase in the number of educators employed due to the pandemic
  • 82% say budget shortfalls have led to an increase in the number of educators employed due to the pandemic
  • 94% say the problem of teacher shortage is getting worse
  • 94% say they are concerned about future teacher shortages
  • 29 courses were canceled and 14 converted online due to shortages
  • 24% reported an issue with director shortages, but 38% said they are concerned about future director shortages
  • 94% say shortage of substitute teachers is getting worse
  • 88% are worried about future shortages of substitutes

The 2021 IARSS Illinois Educator Shortage Survey reflects months of collaboration between partners Goshen Education Consulting and Illinois State University. This is the fifth year of consecutive surveys that ask detailed questions about the scale and scope of Illinois’ continuing teacher shortage and compile responses from more than 660 school districts statewide. .

Results from the last two years of surveys indicate that a number of educators have retired prematurely due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. This decrease has exacerbated the shortage of educators in the state, creating a void in the number of qualified teachers entering the educator job market both years.

“Without qualified and properly trained teachers, the quality of education we provide in RE #11 is at risk,” says Thompson. “I and other education administrators in our region will reach out to our local elected officials, civic and community leaders, state education officials, colleges and universities to see how we can collaborate and find opportunities. answers to these issues so that current and future educators can feel safe and successful in their profession.We want to ensure that our students receive the education they rightly deserve in public schools.

The president of the IARSS agrees. “Our schools need help, now more than ever,” says Mark Klaisner, director of West40 ISC in West Chicago. “Over five years of study, we have shown how schools struggle to find qualified teachers and are under enormous stress to provide the best possible education while being understaffed and overwhelmed. COVID-19 has only compounded these challenges. Klaisner is optimistic despite the negative survey results when it comes to determining where the teaching profession needs to go in the future. “We hope these new findings underscore the urgency we all feel to find more dedicated educators who see the wonderful value in helping our children learn and grow and to tackle this difficult, multi-faceted issue with renewed focus and passion,” he said. said.

For more information on the 2021 IARSS Illinois Educator Shortage Survey, go to https://iarss.org/2021-shortage of educators/.

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Opinion / Column: Education issues to watch in 2022 | https://chicago43rd.org/opinion-column-education-issues-to-watch-in-2022/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 02:07:00 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/opinion-column-education-issues-to-watch-in-2022/ Affirmative action and similar policies in college admissions have always been controversial, and 2022 is unlikely to be any different. This year, a case that began in 2014 will reach the United States Supreme Court. This case, Students for Fair Admissions vs. Harvard University, alleges that Harvard’s race-conscious admissions policies discriminate against Asian applicants. The […]]]>

Affirmative action and similar policies in college admissions have always been controversial, and 2022 is unlikely to be any different. This year, a case that began in 2014 will reach the United States Supreme Court. This case, Students for Fair Admissions vs. Harvard University, alleges that Harvard’s race-conscious admissions policies discriminate against Asian applicants.

The case made its way through the court system with a national roster of affluent plaintiffs. This group has filed several unsuccessful lawsuits across the United States, including a loss in October 2021 in a similar case over admissions to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Similar lawsuits have also emerged in San Francisco and Boston over efforts by school districts to make access to academically selective public schools more representative of student populations. These lawsuits reflect broader ideological tensions over who deserves a well-funded elite education and the government’s responsibility to protect that access.

In 2022, count on teachers’ unions to continue to assert themselves in the face of continuing efforts by parent and advocacy groups to limit their power.

Over the past year, teachers’ unions have effectively negotiated the implementation of health guarantees against the spread of COVID-19 in Chicago, New York and Los Angeles. These unions have obtained protective measures such as virtual education, priority access to vaccines for teachers, medical and personal leaves linked to COVID-19, explicit measures to determine when schools will close, protective equipment individual district provided teachers and classroom air filtration systems.

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As Chicago union prepares to vote on distance education, district says schools are safe https://chicago43rd.org/as-chicago-union-prepares-to-vote-on-distance-education-district-says-schools-are-safe/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 04:50:12 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/as-chicago-union-prepares-to-vote-on-distance-education-district-says-schools-are-safe/ As the Chicago Teachers Union prepares to vote Tuesday night on whether to return to virtual education as cases of Covid-19 increase, a move that could potentially trigger an “electronic lockdown” by the school district, the District CEOs pleaded with the union to keep schools open. “There is no evidence that our schools are dangerous,” […]]]>


As the Chicago Teachers Union prepares to vote Tuesday night on whether to return to virtual education as cases of Covid-19 increase, a move that could potentially trigger an “electronic lockdown” by the school district, the District CEOs pleaded with the union to keep schools open.

“There is no evidence that our schools are dangerous,” Chicago Public Schools CEO Pedro Martinez said at a press conference on Tuesday.

But union vice president Stacy Davis Gates said teachers faced “serious staff shortages” and a lack of mitigation measures against Covid-19.

“The layers of mitigation we need to keep our schools open and keep our students inside school buildings haven’t happened here in Chicago,” Davis Gates said on New Day. CNN Tuesday.

The union plans to call an emergency meeting to vote on virtual education after public schools in Chicago, the third largest school district in the country, resumed in-person learning on Monday.

While their vote was in progress, Chicago officials held a second press conference.

Martinez said if teachers don’t show up for work, they won’t get paid.

He also said that even though there are no classes, the buildings will be open for the children to come.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot said there was no doubt that when the area became completely remote last year, “our children suffered”.

She advocated letting school administrators decide when to switch to online learning.

“What I know from talking to public health experts, what I know from talking to our CEO, is that there is no basis in the data, science or common sense for us to stop a whole system when we can do it surgically in a school level where it’s needed, ”she said.

She added that the city had spent more than $ 100 million on mitigation measures, such as improving ventilation systems in schools and HEPA filters.

The union vote comes as pediatric Covid-19 cases nationwide have reached record levels, according to data released Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics, with cases rising nearly 64% over the course of the week ending December 30 compared to the previous week.

Chicago Department of Health Commissioner Allison Arwady, however, argued earlier that Covid-19 does not affect children almost as severely as adults.

“I understand people are afraid,” Arwady said. “I understand that you look at these numbers and see that they are high, but I just want to reassure you that, especially if you are vaccinated, your child is vaccinated, he is really behaving like the flu and we are not closing the districts. school, especially for long periods, for the flu.

“I remain extremely comfortable with the children continuing their education in person,” Arwady said at the first press conference.

She said during the second media event that there were 550,000 children in the city and an average of seven are hospitalized each day – almost all of them are unvaccinated children between the ages of 12 and 17.

Martinez said keeping students in schools gives the district better access for families to get them tested and vaccinated.

“One of the reasons I continue to advocate, including with the leaders of CTU, for schools to stay open and classes to continue, because this is our best chance to reach families,” Martinez said. .

The union meeting will include a survey of group delegates (elected union leaders for individual schools) to find out if they support distance education until the current wave of Covid-19 subsides.

The union will also send the same question electronically to its roughly 25,000 grassroots members on Tuesday, according to a union official.

In a virtual union meeting on Sunday, around 80% of the 8,000 members present said they were unwilling to return to work in person under current conditions, the official said.

If grassroots members voted to return to distance education, these teachers would notify their respective principals on Tuesday evening or Wednesday morning that they would be ready to teach, but only remotely – effectively leaving their physical classrooms.

In similar circumstances in the past, the district threatened to exclude teachers from their distant classes, the official added.

If the union votes in favor of the expulsion, classes will be canceled for Wednesday, Martinez said.

“We’re still determined to try to make a deal,” Martinez said, but “if all this doesn’t work… I will have to cancel classes tomorrow.”

“I have to be responsible, not knowing who is going to show up in the buildings,” Martinez said.

Parents express their frustration

Darian Martyniuk, father of a 7th grade boy at Lane Tech Academic Center and a daughter at Von Steuben High School, said: “I’m glad the kids are back, I’m glad they are trying. to make it work, but I think the whole situation has been a failure of leadership on both sides of the issue. I think the impression is that the union is just cracking up or just using this as a bargaining tactic to get what they want, but I think they have some legitimate concerns.

“They are all masks,” he added. “Forget the distancing… These are the masks. If everyone is wearing masks, transmission drops dramatically. This is really what it is. And if you’re vaccinated, which most teachers at CPS are, I’m pretty sure.

Parent Maureen Kelleher withdrew her Grade 7 daughter from Chicago public schools last year for her handling of the pandemic.

“Fundamentally, the basic issues lie on the shoulders of the CCP leadership and City Hall,” Kelleher said. “The union has a role to play in this area, but it’s the job of the district to figure out how to educate the children no matter what. So the things that they haven’t figured out what to do is look at the situation through the eyes of the people who are in the crosshairs of two things.

The post As the Chicago union prepares to vote on distance education, the district says schools are safe appeared first on CNN.


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The latest Michigan news, sports, business and entertainment at 11:20 a.m. EST https://chicago43rd.org/the-latest-michigan-news-sports-business-and-entertainment-at-1120-a-m-est/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 10:08:56 +0000 https://chicago43rd.org/the-latest-michigan-news-sports-business-and-entertainment-at-1120-a-m-est/ BEACH SAFETY South Haven adds restrictions on Lake Michigan during inclement weather SOITH HAVEN, Mich. (AP) – A southwestern Michigan town teeming with summer vacationers is taking action to prevent people from accessing Lake Michigan in unsafe conditions. South Haven City Council has agreed to install gates to close popular piers at certain times. Swimmers […]]]>


BEACH SAFETY

South Haven adds restrictions on Lake Michigan during inclement weather

SOITH HAVEN, Mich. (AP) – A southwestern Michigan town teeming with summer vacationers is taking action to prevent people from accessing Lake Michigan in unsafe conditions. South Haven City Council has agreed to install gates to close popular piers at certain times. Swimmers could also be fined if they are in the lake, although surfers or kitesurfers who love wind and waves are exempt. City manager Kate Hosier said the app would start with warnings, not fines. A public safety committee made recommendations after the drowning of three people in 2020. South Haven is in the southwest corner of Michigan, a two-hour drive from Chicago.

REDISTRICTION OF MICHIGAN

Black lawmakers file lawsuit to block Michigan redistribution cards

LANSING, Michigan (AP) – Current and former lawmakers in the black states of Detroit have announced an ongoing lawsuit to block Michigan’s new legislative and legislative districts, claiming they are illegally diluting the voting power of African Americans. Monday’s milestone came days after the new Independent Citizens’ Constituency Commission finalized legislative and legislative maps for the United States for 2022 and beyond. The plans are more politically fair for Democrats, but have drawn criticism for reducing the number of seats where African Americans make up the majority of the voting age population. Commissioners say black voters can still elect any candidate they want without representing at least half of a district’s electorate.

ADOLESCENT OUTFIT – DEAD

Family of boy who died after restraint at center settles case

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) – The family of a 16-year-old boy who was held in a closed youth center in western Michigan and died two days later of cardiac arrest have settled a second lawsuit for wrongful death in this case. The settlement between Cornelius Fredricks’ family and Kalamazoo Lakeside Academy was approved on December 29 by a Kalamazoo County judge. It was reached amicably and filed under seal, so no details are available. Another lawsuit was settled on Dec. 2 in federal court in the Western District of Michigan. Fredericks died after being immobilized for 10 minutes in the center on April 29, 2020.

DEADLY CRASH IN THE WRONG PATH

Wrong Way Crash Kills 2, Child In Southeast Michigan

CASCO TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) – Police say two people were killed and a child seriously injured when a vehicle traveling the wrong way on Interstate 94 collided with a second vehicle in the southeast from Michigan. State Police said a 25-year-old westbound man from St. Clair drove his car on the eastbound lanes of the freeway Monday afternoon in Casco Township, County. of St. Clair. Her car then crashed head-on into a sport utility vehicle driven by a 33-year-old woman from the township of Casco. The Macomb Daily reports that both drivers died of their injuries and that a child who was a passenger in the SUV was hospitalized in critical condition with injuries in an accident.

MICHIGAN VIRUS OUTBREAK

Some schools expecting virus wave go online and cancel classes

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (AP) – The continued increase in coronavirus cases in Michigan and an expected increase after Christmas and New Years are extending vacation time for some students. Classes scheduled to resume on Monday have been canceled or moved online in several districts. Detroit public schools are closed at least until Wednesday. Schools in Ann Arbor in Washtenaw County will be away from Wednesday through Friday. Oak Park canceled classes on Monday and says distance learning will be distance learning for the rest of the week. Southfield Public Schools have switched to online distance learning for the week. The state has reported 61,235 new cases of the virus since Thursday.


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